• Woman on trial for stealing human kidney Daily Monitor | 17 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Juliet Kigongo

    Woman on trial for stealing human kidney

    A woman has been committed to the High Court for trial on charges of aggravated human trafficking and luring her shop attendant into donating his kidney to her husband. Miria Rwigambwa, a businesswoman in Mbarara District is accused by Brian Arinaitwe of duping and facilitating him to India for removal of his body part. The accused appeared before Nakawa Grade One Magistrate, Noah Sajjabi who committed her to the High Court for trial...

  • CoE Statement on GKE

    STATEMENT ON THE GLOBAL KIDNEY EXCHANGE CONCEPT


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.


    The concept of Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) has been recently proposed as a means to increase the number of donor-recipient pairs that can benefit from kidney exchange programmes in highincome countries (HIC). The Council of Europe Committee on Organ Transplantation (CD-P-TO) with the support of the Council of Europe Committee on Bioethics (DHBIO) has carefully studied the GKE proposal. Read their conclusions here.

  • Update extended April

    Participate in the DICG public consultation concerning the Declaration of Istanbul (2018 Edition)


    To view the draft DoI (2018 Edition) and provide your feedback via our survey, please click here.

    Deadline 20 April 2018


    To celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Declaration of Istanbul (DoI), a working group of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) has prepared a draft update to the Declaration. The revisions made in this 2018 Edition are intended to ensure that the DoI remains a valuable source of ethical guidance for health professionals and policy makers during the next decade in the face of persisting and emerging challenges in organ trafficking and transplant tourism around the world. To achieve this goal, we need your help.

    Please share your time and expertise with us, and provide feedback on our draft documents here.

  • Council of Europe convention against organtrafficking enters into force Council of Europe Convention | 1 March 2018
    [read the article]


    By Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs

    Trafficking in human organs: Council of Europe convention enters into force

    The Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs entered into force today in the five first states that have so far ratified it: Albania, Czech Republic, Malta, the Republic of Moldova and Norway.

    The convention, the first international treaty aimed at preventing and combating trafficking in human organs, has been signed by another seventeen states...

  • Israeli organ-smuggling mastermind arrested in Cyprus [read the article]


    By AFP

    Israeli organ-smuggling ‘mastermind’ arrested in Cyprus

    PRISTINA, Kosovo — The Israeli ringleader of a global gang of organ traffickers has been arrested in Cyprus, Kosovan police said on Saturday.

    Moshe Harel is suspected of organizing dozens of illegal kidney transplants at the Medicus clinic in the capital Pristina in 2008, and is the man being held, according to local media...

  • Indias laws on organ transplants do little to protect rights of organ donors [read the article]

    [read the Vidhi Report]


    By Menaka Rao

    The legal framework needs to ensure that the donor gives informed consent as well as legal and medical aid for donors.

    In August 2016, Surat resident Brijkishore Jaiswal needed a kidney transplant and was all set to receive one from Shobha Thakur, a 42-year-old domestic worker from rural Gujarat. But in order to get the kidney, Jaiswal tried to pass Thakur off as his wife and said that she was donating the organ altruistically. Jaiswal was paying Thakur for her kidney and thus breaking the law, which bans commercial organ donation...

  • What are red marketsInternational Business Times | 09 December 2017
    [read the article]


    By Lara Rebello

    ‘What are red markets? World's major organ trafficking countries bank on poverty and desperation

    A recent investigative piece into the conditions of African migrants stuck in Libya raised the curtain on the underground slave trade rings in the country and triggered international calls for investigations into the matter. It also shed light on the organ market that has been burgeoning alongside — banking on the bodies of financially desperate migrants. The migrant crisis in Africa as well as other parts of the world has offered organ traffickers a steady flow of donors — willing or unwilling — to sever ties with their kidneys, livers and other body parts....

  • Woman on trial for stealing human kidney Daily Monitor | 17 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Juliet Kigongo

    Woman on trial for stealing human kidney

    A woman has been committed to the High Court for trial on charges of aggravated human trafficking and luring her shop attendant into donating his kidney to her husband. Miria Rwigambwa, a businesswoman in Mbarara District is accused by Brian Arinaitwe of duping and facilitating him to India for removal of his body part. The accused appeared before Nakawa Grade One Magistrate, Noah Sajjabi who committed her to the High Court for trial...

  • CoE Statement on GKE

    STATEMENT ON THE GLOBAL KIDNEY EXCHANGE CONCEPT


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.


    The concept of Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) has been recently proposed as a means to increase the number of donor-recipient pairs that can benefit from kidney exchange programmes in highincome countries (HIC). The Council of Europe Committee on Organ Transplantation (CD-P-TO) with the support of the Council of Europe Committee on Bioethics (DHBIO) has carefully studied the GKE proposal. Read their conclusions here.

  • Update extended April

    Participate in the DICG public consultation concerning the Declaration of Istanbul (2018 Edition)


    To view the draft DoI (2018 Edition) and provide your feedback via our survey, please click here.

    Deadline 20 April 2018


    To celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Declaration of Istanbul (DoI), a working group of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) has prepared a draft update to the Declaration. The revisions made in this 2018 Edition are intended to ensure that the DoI remains a valuable source of ethical guidance for health professionals and policy makers during the next decade in the face of persisting and emerging challenges in organ trafficking and transplant tourism around the world. To achieve this goal, we need your help.

    Please share your time and expertise with us, and provide feedback on our draft documents here.

  • Council of Europe convention against organtrafficking enters into force Council of Europe Convention | 1 March 2018
    [read the article]


    By Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs

    Trafficking in human organs: Council of Europe convention enters into force

    The Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs entered into force today in the five first states that have so far ratified it: Albania, Czech Republic, Malta, the Republic of Moldova and Norway.

    The convention, the first international treaty aimed at preventing and combating trafficking in human organs, has been signed by another seventeen states...

  • Israeli organ-smuggling mastermind arrested in Cyprus [read the article]


    By AFP

    Israeli organ-smuggling ‘mastermind’ arrested in Cyprus

    PRISTINA, Kosovo — The Israeli ringleader of a global gang of organ traffickers has been arrested in Cyprus, Kosovan police said on Saturday.

    Moshe Harel is suspected of organizing dozens of illegal kidney transplants at the Medicus clinic in the capital Pristina in 2008, and is the man being held, according to local media...

  • Indias laws on organ transplants do little to protect rights of organ donors [read the article]

    [read the Vidhi Report]


    By Menaka Rao

    The legal framework needs to ensure that the donor gives informed consent as well as legal and medical aid for donors.

    In August 2016, Surat resident Brijkishore Jaiswal needed a kidney transplant and was all set to receive one from Shobha Thakur, a 42-year-old domestic worker from rural Gujarat. But in order to get the kidney, Jaiswal tried to pass Thakur off as his wife and said that she was donating the organ altruistically. Jaiswal was paying Thakur for her kidney and thus breaking the law, which bans commercial organ donation...

  • What are red marketsInternational Business Times | 09 December 2017
    [read the article]


    By Lara Rebello

    ‘What are red markets? World's major organ trafficking countries bank on poverty and desperation

    A recent investigative piece into the conditions of African migrants stuck in Libya raised the curtain on the underground slave trade rings in the country and triggered international calls for investigations into the matter. It also shed light on the organ market that has been burgeoning alongside — banking on the bodies of financially desperate migrants. The migrant crisis in Africa as well as other parts of the world has offered organ traffickers a steady flow of donors — willing or unwilling — to sever ties with their kidneys, livers and other body parts....

  • How Indians were trafficked for organs in EgyptThe Indian Times | 23 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sumitra Debroy

    ‘Donate your kidney or face jail in Cairo’

    Yaseer Ahmed Basha (29) father to a six-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, is unaware that he too is now an accused in the international kidney racket for selling his left kidney to Malad resident Pankaj Rao. He maintained that he was threatened and tricked into giving his kidney after he went to Cairo in July with the promise of driving an Uber cab. "It was 99% deception, but 1% my greed for money." He now makes a living driving an autorickshaw to support his parents there and his family in Taloja...

  • Some U.S. Hospitals Dont Put Americans First for Liver TransplantsProPublica and Fox 8 WVUE New Orleans| 20 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Charles Ornstein and Lee Zurik

    Some U.S. Hospitals Don’t Put Americans First for Liver Transplants

    At a time when there aren’t enough livers for ailing Americans, wealthy foreigners fly here for transplants.

    Dr. Gabriel M. Danovitch, Honoury member of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group, talks about national self sufficiency in organ donation.

    Also see Fox 8 News video on this co-published story...

  • Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospitals kidney transplantation licenceHindustan Times | 17 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By HT Correspondent

    Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospital’s kidney transplantation licence

    The Delhi government has ordered the suspension of Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals’ licence for kidney transplants till January 5 after police busted a kidney racket involving secretarial staff of doctors working at the hospital last year.

    During the suspension period, the hospital cannot register new kidney transplant patients, but close to 40 patients who have been cleared by the committee for transplantation will continue with their treatment...

Living and Deceased Organ Donation Should Be Financially Neutral Acts

FL Delmonico, D Martin, B Domínguez-Gil, E Muller, V Jha, A Levin, GM Danovitch, and AM Capron


AJT logo

2015; Epub March 31

The supply of organs—particularly kidneys—donated by living and deceased donors falls short of the number of patients added annually to transplant waiting lists in the United States. To remedy this problem, a number of prominent physicians, ethicists, economists and others have mounted a campaign to suspend the prohibitions in the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984 (NOTA) on the buying and selling of organs. The argument that providing financial benefits would incentivize enough people to part with a kidney (or a portion of a liver) to clear the waiting lists is flawed. This commentary marshals arguments against the claim that the shortage of donor organs would best be overcome by providing financial incentives for donation. We can increase the number of organs available for transplantation by removing all financial disincentives that deter unpaid living or deceased kidney donation. These disincentives include a range of burdens, such as the costs of travel and lodging for medical evaluation and surgery, lost wages, and the expense of dependent care during the period of organ removal and recuperation. Organ donation should remain an act that is financially neutral for donors, neither imposing financial burdens nor enriching them monetarily.

Read the complete article here at the American Journal of Transplantation(subscription required).

The Impact of the Israeli Transplantation Law on the Socio-Demographic Profile of Living Kidney Donors

Boas H, Mor E, Michowitz R, Rozen-Zvi B, and Rahamimov R


AJT logo

2015; 15(4):1076-80

The Israeli transplantation law of 2008 stipulated that organ trading is a criminal offense, and banned the reimbursement of such transplants by insurance companies, thus decreasing dramatically transplant tourism from Israel. We evaluated the law’s impact on the number and the socio-demographic features of 575 consecutive living donors, transplanted in the largest Israeli transplantation center, spanning 5 years prior to 5 years after the law’s implementation. Living kidney donations increased from 3.51.5 donations per month in the pre-law period to 6.12.4 per month post-law (p<0.001). This was mainly due to a rise in intra-familial donations from 2.11.1 per month to 4.62.1 per month (p<0.001). In unrelated donors we found a significant change in their socio-demographic characteristics: mean age increased from 35.47.4 to 39.910.2 (p¼0.001), an increase in the proportion of donors with college level or higher education (31.0% to 63.1%; p<0.001) and donors with white collar occupations (33.3% to 48.3%, p¼0.023). In conclusion, the Israeli legislation that prohibited transplant tourism and organ trading in accordance with Istanbul Declaration, was associated with an increase in local transplantation activity, mainly from related living kidney donors, and a change in the profile of unrelated donors into an older, higher educated, white collar population.

Read the complete article here at the American Journal of Transplantation (subscription required).

ITNS Releases Position Statement on Financial Incentives for Organ Donation

ITNSITNS | March 20, 2015


Chicago, IL - The International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS) has released a position statement on financial incentives for organ donation.

ITNS endorses the recommendation of the World Health Assembly and the Declaration of Istanbul that financial incentives for living organ donation be prohibited, as they pose unacceptable risks to potential donors and vulnerable communities across the world, undermine efforts to promote equity in donation and transplantation, and may endanger the progress achieved through best practice in altruistic donation programs.

ITNS endorses the World Health Assembly recommendation that financial incentives for authorization of organ procurement from deceased persons should be prohibited, recognizing that the next of kin may be vulnerable to harm including exploitation and coercion, and concerned that payment of incentives would undermine public trust in the process of deceased donation.

ITNS further strongly supports the recommendation of the World Health Assembly, the Declaration of Istanbul and other professional organizations that greater efforts be made to remove financial disincentives to living donation, so as to improve supply of organs for transplantation and reduce inequities in access to living donation.

ITNS rejects recent proposals for the trial of incentives for living donors, due to the fact that a number of evidence-based strategies of proven efficacy in increasing organ donation have yet to be implemented and should be prioritized, and that although trial risks may be reduced in a highly regulated environment, the legalization of trials in developed countries may exert a negative influence on policy and practice in countries with less capacity for effective regulation.

“This statement communicates the Society's position on financial incentives for organ donation to our members, other healthcare organizations, patients, and the general public and provides guidance for ITNS members in their professional practice and advocacy work on behalf of patients” commented Sandra Cupples, PhD, RN, FAAN, ITNS Research Director.

For a copy of the position statement, please visit http://www.itns.org/About/About/postitionstatements.html

 

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