• DICG Statement on GKEP

    Statement of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group concerning ethical objections to the proposed Global Kidney Exchange Program


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.

     


    In accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Istanbul and the Guiding Principles of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) is committed not only to discouraging practices and policies that directly or indirectly contribute to organ trafficking and transplant tourism but also to supporting the development and strengthening of equitable programs of donation and transplantation around the world....

  • How Indians were trafficked for organs in EgyptThe Indian Times | 23 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sumitra Debroy

    ‘Donate your kidney or face jail in Cairo’

    Yaseer Ahmed Basha (29) father to a six-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, is unaware that he too is now an accused in the international kidney racket for selling his left kidney to Malad resident Pankaj Rao. He maintained that he was threatened and tricked into giving his kidney after he went to Cairo in July with the promise of driving an Uber cab. "It was 99% deception, but 1% my greed for money." He now makes a living driving an autorickshaw to support his parents there and his family in Taloja...

  • Some U.S. Hospitals Dont Put Americans First for Liver TransplantsProPublica and Fox 8 WVUE New Orleans| 20 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Charles Ornstein and Lee Zurik

    Some U.S. Hospitals Don’t Put Americans First for Liver Transplants

    At a time when there aren’t enough livers for ailing Americans, wealthy foreigners fly here for transplants.

    Dr. Gabriel M. Danovitch, Honoury member of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group, talks about national self sufficiency in organ donation.

    Also see Fox 8 News video on this co-published story...

  • Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospitals kidney transplantation licenceHindustan Times | 17 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By HT Correspondent

    Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospital’s kidney transplantation licence

    The Delhi government has ordered the suspension of Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals’ licence for kidney transplants till January 5 after police busted a kidney racket involving secretarial staff of doctors working at the hospital last year.

    During the suspension period, the hospital cannot register new kidney transplant patients, but close to 40 patients who have been cleared by the committee for transplantation will continue with their treatment...

  • Bonds of lifeThe Japan News | 27 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Yomiuri Shimbun

    Bonds of life — the Organ Transplant Law 20 years on

    The Yomiuri Shimbun writes in a five part installment on the Organ Transplant Law in Japan and the 20 years after it came in practice.

    The article link focus on desperate recipients who has traveled to other countries for transplantation, but for a fuller understanding of the situation in Japan, read all five.

  • Should you be allowed to sell your kidneyGizmodo Media Group | 09 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Whitney Kimball

    Should You Be Allowed to Sell Your Kidney?

    Giz Asks, talked to bioethicists, disagreeing doctors and the World Health Organization about their opinions...

  • Kidney trafficking broker faces courtKhmer Times | 20 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Buth Reaksmey Kongkea

    Kidney trafficking broker faces court

    An alleged member of an organ trafficking ring was charged yesterday over a year-long kidney sale operation involving at least 10 victims.

    Construction worker Cheoun Thi, 38, of Phnom Penh was accused of unlawful removal of organs with purpose and “the act of selling, buying or exchanging a person”, which includes selling, buying or exchanging organs.

    The charges, laid in Phnom Penh Municipal Court, fall under the Law on Suppression of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation. They carry a jail term of up to 15 years...

  • DICG Statement on GKEP

    Statement of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group concerning ethical objections to the proposed Global Kidney Exchange Program


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.

     


    In accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Istanbul and the Guiding Principles of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) is committed not only to discouraging practices and policies that directly or indirectly contribute to organ trafficking and transplant tourism but also to supporting the development and strengthening of equitable programs of donation and transplantation around the world....

  • How Indians were trafficked for organs in EgyptThe Indian Times | 23 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sumitra Debroy

    ‘Donate your kidney or face jail in Cairo’

    Yaseer Ahmed Basha (29) father to a six-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, is unaware that he too is now an accused in the international kidney racket for selling his left kidney to Malad resident Pankaj Rao. He maintained that he was threatened and tricked into giving his kidney after he went to Cairo in July with the promise of driving an Uber cab. "It was 99% deception, but 1% my greed for money." He now makes a living driving an autorickshaw to support his parents there and his family in Taloja...

  • Some U.S. Hospitals Dont Put Americans First for Liver TransplantsProPublica and Fox 8 WVUE New Orleans| 20 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Charles Ornstein and Lee Zurik

    Some U.S. Hospitals Don’t Put Americans First for Liver Transplants

    At a time when there aren’t enough livers for ailing Americans, wealthy foreigners fly here for transplants.

    Dr. Gabriel M. Danovitch, Honoury member of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group, talks about national self sufficiency in organ donation.

    Also see Fox 8 News video on this co-published story...

  • Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospitals kidney transplantation licenceHindustan Times | 17 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By HT Correspondent

    Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospital’s kidney transplantation licence

    The Delhi government has ordered the suspension of Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals’ licence for kidney transplants till January 5 after police busted a kidney racket involving secretarial staff of doctors working at the hospital last year.

    During the suspension period, the hospital cannot register new kidney transplant patients, but close to 40 patients who have been cleared by the committee for transplantation will continue with their treatment...

  • Bonds of lifeThe Japan News | 27 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Yomiuri Shimbun

    Bonds of life — the Organ Transplant Law 20 years on

    The Yomiuri Shimbun writes in a five part installment on the Organ Transplant Law in Japan and the 20 years after it came in practice.

    The article link focus on desperate recipients who has traveled to other countries for transplantation, but for a fuller understanding of the situation in Japan, read all five.

  • Should you be allowed to sell your kidneyGizmodo Media Group | 09 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Whitney Kimball

    Should You Be Allowed to Sell Your Kidney?

    Giz Asks, talked to bioethicists, disagreeing doctors and the World Health Organization about their opinions...

  • Kidney trafficking broker faces courtKhmer Times | 20 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Buth Reaksmey Kongkea

    Kidney trafficking broker faces court

    An alleged member of an organ trafficking ring was charged yesterday over a year-long kidney sale operation involving at least 10 victims.

    Construction worker Cheoun Thi, 38, of Phnom Penh was accused of unlawful removal of organs with purpose and “the act of selling, buying or exchanging a person”, which includes selling, buying or exchanging organs.

    The charges, laid in Phnom Penh Municipal Court, fall under the Law on Suppression of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation. They carry a jail term of up to 15 years...

  • Nigerians warnedBuzzNigeria | 18 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Iheoma Hendy

    Kidney Trafficking: Federal Goverment Alarmed Over High Rate Of Practice, Expose Hospitals

    The health ministry has written to the Nigerian Medical Association to warn all doctors in relevant specialties to create awareness for Nigerians intending to travel to Egypt for medical attention.

    The memo by the Director for Hospital services, Dr Wapada I. Balami for the Minister of Health entitled, "41 suspected illegal human kidney traffickers on the trail in Egypt" raises concern about patients possibly seeking treatment abroad and their doctors referring them to any complicit hospital...

  • Kidney for sale - Iran has a legal market for the organsLos Angeles Times | 15 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Shashank Bengali and Ramin Mostaghim

    'Kidney for sale': Iran has a legal market for the organs, but the system doesn't always work

    The advertisements are scrawled in marker on brick walls and tree trunks, and affixed to telephone utility boxes, sidewalks and a road sign pointing the way to one of Iran’s leading hospitals.

    “Kidney for sale,” read the dozens of messages, accompanied by phone numbers and blood types, splashed along a tree-lined street opposite the Hasheminejad Kidney Center in Tehran.

    New ads appear almost daily. Behind each is a tale of individual woe — joblessness, debt, a family emergency — in a country beset by economic despair.

  • Eight arrested in Nowshera for illegal kidney transplantsThe Express Tribune | 26 September 2017
    [read the article]


    By Tribune Correspondent

    Eight arrested in Nowshera for illegal kidney transplants

    The FIA has arrested eight people, including a surgeon, for being involved in an illegal kidney transplant racket in Nowshera, officials said on Tuesday. “It [kidney transplantation] was being carried out illegally where poor people were offered some money for donating their kidneys,” said Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) official Mumtaz...

Should we perform kidney transplants on foreign nationals?


Marie-Chantal Fortin, Bryn Williams-Jones

Journal of Medical Ethics, 2014, 40(12):821-6

In Canada, there are currently no guidelines at either the federal or provincial level regarding the provision of kidney transplantation services to foreign nationals (FN). Renal transplant centres have, in the past, agreed to put refugee claimants and other FNs on the renal transplant waiting list, in part, because these patients (refugee claimants) had health insurance through the Interim Federal Health Programme to cover the costs of medication and hospital care. However, severe cuts recently made to this programme have forced clinicians to question whether they should continue with transplants for FNs, for financial and ethical reasons.
This paper first examines different national policies (eg, in Canada, USA, France and the UK) to map the diversity of approaches regarding transplantation for FNs, and then works through different considerations commonly used to support or oppose the provision of organs to these patients: (1) the organ shortage; (2) the free-rider problem; (3) the risk of becoming a transplant destination; (4) the impact on organ donation rates; (5) physicians’ duties; (6) economic concerns; (7) vulnerability. Using a Canadian case as a focus, and generalising through a review of various national policies, we analyse the arguments for and against transplantation for FNs with a view to bringing clarity to what is a sensitive political and clinical management issue. Our aim is to help transplant centres, clinicians and ethicists reflect on the merits of possible options, and the rationales behind them.

Read the full article at the Journal of Medical Ethics here (subscription required).

The Doha Model of Organ Donation and Transplantation: Thinking Beyond Citizenship

Dominique Martin and Riadh A.S. Fadhil

Griffith Journal of Law and Human Dignity 2(2):293-329


 This paper reviews the policy and practice of organ donation and transplantation in Qatar that has developed since January 2011. The important features of the Doha Model (the ‘Model’) are explored, including: (i) all legal residents of Qatar have an equal right to access deceased donor organs and transplantation regardless of their citizenship status; (ii) no prioritisation in organ allocation is given to Qatari citizens; (iii) a multilingual and multicultural education and promotional program about donation has been implemented to engage the diverse national communities resident within Qatar; (iv) financial incentives or fungible rewards for living or deceased donation are prohibited. The ethical framework of this policy will be examined in the light of the national self-sufficiency paradigm, which advocates reciprocity and solidarity among resident populations seeking to meet all needs for transplantation equitably. We review some preliminary evidence of the impact of the Model with respect to engagement of a highly diverse multinational population in a donation and transplantation program, and argue that the Model may inform policy and practice in other countries, particularly those with non-citizen resident populations.

Read the complete article courtesy of the Griffith Journal of Law and Human Dignity here.

The global diffusion of organ transplantation: trends, drivers and policy implications

S. L. White, R. Hirth, B. Mahillo, B. Dominguez-Gil, F. L. Delmonico, L. Noel, J. Chapman, R. Matesanz, M. Carmona, M. Alvarez, J.R. Nunez, & A. Leichtman

Bulletin of the World Health Organization 2014; 92:826-835.


 

Rising incomes, the spread of personal insurance, lifestyle factors adding to the burden of illness, ageing populations, globalization and skills transfer within the medical community have increased worldwide demand for organ transplantation. The Global Observatory on Donation and Transplantation, which was built in response to World Health Assembly resolution WHA57.18, has conducted ongoing documentation of global transplantation activities since 2007. In this paper, we use the Global Observatory’s data to describe the current distribution of – and trends in – transplantation activities and to evaluate the role of health systems factors and macroeconomics in the diffusion of transplantation technology. We then consider the implications of our results for health policies relating to organ donation and transplantation. Of the World Health Organization’s Member States, most now engage in organ transplantation and more than a third performed deceased donor transplantation in 2011. In general, the Member States that engage in organ transplantation have greater access to physician services and greater total health spending per capita than the Member States where organ transplantation is not performed. The provision of deceased donor transplantation was closely associated with high levels of gross national income per capita. There are several ways in which governments can support the ethical development of organ donation and transplantation programmes. Specifically, they can ensure that appropriate legislation, regulation and oversight are in place, and monitor donation and transplantation activities, practices and outcomes. Moreover, they can allocate resources towards the training of specialist physicians, surgeons and transplant coordinators, and implement a professional donor-procurement network.

Download the complete article here courtesy of the World Health Organization.

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