• GAEBA Media Release
    [read the full statement]


    Global eyecare community to unveil new ethical agreement for use of eye tissue

    Barcelona Thursday 14th June 2018: Members of the global eyecare and eye bank community unveiled the world’s first global Agreement on the use of donated human tissue for ocular transplantation, research, and future technologies, named the Barcelona Principles: An Agreement on the use of human donated tissue for ocular transplantation, research and future technologies.

     

    Read the Barcelona Agreement [here]

  • What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange programs International Policy Headlines | 08 June 2018
    [read the article]


    What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) programs?

    Critics of GKE programs argue that it would offer financial and symbolic incentives that have the potential of promoting organ trafficking, that it wrongly assumes that low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) do not offer organ transplantation to those who need it, and would add barriers to the efforts that LMICs countries are already doing to improve their responses to end-stage renal failure and organ trafficking...

  • Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts Gulf Times | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts

    Qatar reaffirmed on Saturday its support for concerted international efforts to develop ethical programmes for the donation and cultivation of human organs throughout the world. HE the Minister of Public Health Dr Hanan Mohamed al-Kuwari made the remarks during a meeting discussing the establishment of organ transplant programmes around the world, as part of the ongoing meetings of the World Health Assembly in Geneva since Monday...

  • Donor organ rumors refuted in Geneva China Daily | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By China Daily

    China to share organ transplant expertise

    Huang Jiefu, chairman of the China National Organ Donation and Transplantation Committee and also a former vice-minister of health, was speaking at a side event, entitled "Towards Universal Access to Solid Organ Transplantation", during the 71st World Health Assembly, which is running from May 21-26...

  • Proposed Bill to prohibit Canadians participating in organ trafficking abroad  Epoch Times | 23 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Omid Ghoreishi

    Senate Committee Hears from Experts on Human Organ Trafficking

    Senators in the upper house’s human rights standing committee heard on May 23 about why Canada should have its own legislation to combat organ trafficking. Bill aims to make it a criminal offence for Canadians to procure an organ abroad that was taken by force...

  • Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo Ahram Online | 18 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo

    Egypt’s interior ministry said on Friday it had arrested a number of people running an organ trafficking ring in Cairo.

    In an official statement, the interior ministry said the members of the ring had encouraged Egyptians on lower incomes in Cairo’s Ramses district to sell their organs.

    Three suspected members of the ring were arrested; one of the suspects, a butcher, had been given a 15-year prison term in a human trafficking case previously...

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • GAEBA Media Release
    [read the full statement]


    Global eyecare community to unveil new ethical agreement for use of eye tissue

    Barcelona Thursday 14th June 2018: Members of the global eyecare and eye bank community unveiled the world’s first global Agreement on the use of donated human tissue for ocular transplantation, research, and future technologies, named the Barcelona Principles: An Agreement on the use of human donated tissue for ocular transplantation, research and future technologies.

     

    Read the Barcelona Agreement [here]

  • What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange programs International Policy Headlines | 08 June 2018
    [read the article]


    What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) programs?

    Critics of GKE programs argue that it would offer financial and symbolic incentives that have the potential of promoting organ trafficking, that it wrongly assumes that low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) do not offer organ transplantation to those who need it, and would add barriers to the efforts that LMICs countries are already doing to improve their responses to end-stage renal failure and organ trafficking...

  • Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts Gulf Times | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts

    Qatar reaffirmed on Saturday its support for concerted international efforts to develop ethical programmes for the donation and cultivation of human organs throughout the world. HE the Minister of Public Health Dr Hanan Mohamed al-Kuwari made the remarks during a meeting discussing the establishment of organ transplant programmes around the world, as part of the ongoing meetings of the World Health Assembly in Geneva since Monday...

  • Donor organ rumors refuted in Geneva China Daily | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By China Daily

    China to share organ transplant expertise

    Huang Jiefu, chairman of the China National Organ Donation and Transplantation Committee and also a former vice-minister of health, was speaking at a side event, entitled "Towards Universal Access to Solid Organ Transplantation", during the 71st World Health Assembly, which is running from May 21-26...

  • Proposed Bill to prohibit Canadians participating in organ trafficking abroad  Epoch Times | 23 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Omid Ghoreishi

    Senate Committee Hears from Experts on Human Organ Trafficking

    Senators in the upper house’s human rights standing committee heard on May 23 about why Canada should have its own legislation to combat organ trafficking. Bill aims to make it a criminal offence for Canadians to procure an organ abroad that was taken by force...

  • Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo Ahram Online | 18 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo

    Egypt’s interior ministry said on Friday it had arrested a number of people running an organ trafficking ring in Cairo.

    In an official statement, the interior ministry said the members of the ring had encouraged Egyptians on lower incomes in Cairo’s Ramses district to sell their organs.

    Three suspected members of the ring were arrested; one of the suspects, a butcher, had been given a 15-year prison term in a human trafficking case previously...

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    In some parts of India donations are increasingly saving lives. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. But more than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • South Koreans traveling for transplant Korea Biomedical Review | 05 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Marian Chu

    ‘South Korea indirectly fuels organ trafficking in China’

    South Koreans were one of the largest consumer groups of organ transplants in China, indirectly contributing to the unethical organ harvesting market there, speakers at a seminar said.

    The data on organ transplants were presented at the “Vital Link seminar,” hosted by the Korean Society for Transplantation, Vital Link, Korea Organ Donation Network, and the Korea Organ Donation Agency, at Seoul National University Hospital on Thursday...

  • Kosovo case Balkan Transitional Justice | 02 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Dean B. Pineles

    Kosovo’s Medicus Case: Bad Omen for Rule of Law

    Six years of efforts to deliver justice were wasted when the defendants convicted in the Medicus organ-trafficking case were inexplicably sent for retrial, says a judge who served on the original trial panel.

Epistemic Communities, Human Rights, and the Global Diffusion of Legislation against the Organ Trade

F. Amahazion


Social Sciences

2016; Epub October 27

Abstract

Over the past several decades, over 100 countries have passed legislation banning commercial organ transplantation. What explains this rapid, global diffusion of laws? Based on qualitative data from in-depth interviews, historical analysis, and secondary sources, this paper explores the role played by the medical epistemic community and human rights in the global spread of laws against the organ trade. In addition to shaping, guiding, and influencing norms and approaches to transplantation, the epistemic community has been instrumental in the development of various resolutions, policy initiatives, recommended practices, statements, legislation, and model laws. Moreover, the epistemic community helped position the organ trade as an issue of societal and global importance, and it persistently encouraged states to undertake actions, such as implementing legislation, to combat the organ trade. Critically, the epistemic community’s efforts against the organ trade incorporated the concepts of human rights, integrity, and dignity, which had diffused globally and become institutionalized in the period after WWII.

Read the complete article courtesy of Social Sciences here.

Providing coverage for the unique life‐long health care needs of living kidney donors within the framework of financial neutrality

J.S. Gill, F. L. Delmonico, S. Klarenbach, A. M. Capron


AJT logo

2016; Epub November 26

Abstract

Organ donation should neither enrich nor impose financial burdens on donors. We describe the scope of health care required for all living kidney donors that reflects contemporary understanding of long-term donor health outcomes, propose an approach to identify donor health conditions which should be covered within the framework of financial neutrality, and propose strategies to pay for this care. Despite the Affordable Care Act in the United States, donors continue to have inadequate coverage for important health conditions that are either donation related or may compromise post-donation kidney function. Amendment of Medicare regulations is needed to clarify that surveillance and treatment of conditions that may compromise post-donation kidney function following donor nephrectomy will be covered without expense to the donor. In other countries lacking health insurance for all residents, sufficient data exist to allow creation of a compensation fund or donor insurance policies to ensure appropriate care. Providing coverage for donation-related sequelae as well as care to preserve post-donation kidney function ensures protection against the financial burdens of health care encountered by donors throughout their lifetime. Providing coverage for this care should thus be cost-effective even without considering the health care cost savings that occur in living donor transplant recipients.

Click here to read the article (subscription required).

New paper highlights difficulties of measuring transplant tourism

AJT logo

In a new paper in the American Journal of Transplantation, Ambagtsheer et al. (2016) "conclude that the scientific literature does not reflect a large number of patients buying organs." After performing a literature review, they document 6002 transplant tourists internationally, between 1971 and 2013, of whom 1238 reportedly obtained commercial transplants. However, in a letter commenting on the study, Ahn et al. (2016) note that Saudi Arabia alone has reported a total of 6079 patients obtaining kidney transplants abroad between 1998 and 2013. The authors of both papers highlight the difficulties of estimating global activity in commercial transplants and travel for transplantation, and the limits of literature reviews. They also emphasise the valuable roles of national and international registries and of transplant professionals in collecting and reporting data on these phenomena, as the comprehensive data published by the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation illustrates. 

The DICG is currently working with members and collaborating organizations to develop tools and guidelines that will facilitate collection and analysis of data concerning travel for transplantation and organ trafficking, in order to inform strategies to prevent harm and improve equitable access to transplantation worldwide.

Ambagtsheer, F., de Jong, J., Brame, W.M., Weimar, W. 2016. On patients who purchase organ transplants abroad. American Journal of Transplantation, 16: 2800-2815.

Abstract:

The international transplant community portrays organ trade as a growing and serious crime involving large numbers of traveling patients who purchase organs. We present a systematic review about the published number of patients who purchased organs. With this information, we discuss whether the scientific literature reflects a substantial practice of organ purchase. Between 2000 and 2015, 86 studies were published. Seventy-six of these presented patients who traveled and 42 stated that the trans- plants were commercial. Only 11 studies reported that patients paid, and eight described to what or whom patients paid. In total, during a period of 42 years, 6002 patients have been reported to travel for transplantation. Of these, only 1238 were reported to have paid for their transplants. An additional unknown number of patients paid for their transplants in their native countries. We conclude that the scientific literature does not reflect a large number of patients buying organs. Organ purchases were more often assumed than determined. A reporting code for transplant professionals to report organ trafficking networks is a potential strategy to collect and quantify cases. 

Click here to read the complete article.

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