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Pope Francis addresses Judges' summit on human trafficking and organized crime

Pope Vatican Radio TimesVatican Radio| June 3, 2016

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Pope Francis on Friday evening made an unexpected appearance at the Judges' Summit on Human Trafficking and Organized Crime, a two day conference taking place in the Vatican and organized by the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences.

Speaking to judges and prosecutors from around the world, the Holy Father asked them "to fulfill their vocation and their crucial mission — to establish justice — without which there is neither order nor sustainable and integral development, nor social peace". He said judges’ unique contribution to humanity is a result of their ‘understanding of indifference and its extreme forms in a globalized world’...

DICG Senior Advisor Francis Delmonico participated in this meeting of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and the Declaration of Istanbul is cited in the declaration produced as a result of the meeting. To learn more, please click here.

Kidney trade racket busted, five arrested

The Tribune IndiaThe Tribune | June 4, 2016

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NEW DELHI - Five persons, including two employees of Apollo Hospital, have been arrested for allegedly running an illegal trade of human organs by luring people from across India to donate their kidneys in exchange for money, police said today.

The five accused have been identified as Aseem Sikdar (37), who hails from North 24 Pargana, West Bengal, Satya Prakash, alias Ashu (30), who hails from Kanpur, UP, Devashish Moulik (30), who hails from New Jalpaiguri, West Bengal, Aditya Singh (24) from Aali Vihar, Delhi and Shailesh Saxena, alias Sonu (31), who is a resident of Badarpur in Delhi. Aditya and Shailesh have been working as personal secretaries to Apollo Hospital doctors for the past three to four years, said the police.

On May 30, the police were tipped off that a gang is involved in the illegal trade of human organs. 

"It was revealed that the gang lured needy people from various parts of the country to donate their kidney in exchange of money. They also prepared forged papers, including the ID proofs, to establish the relationship between the donors and the recipients. It was also revealed that the staff of Apollo Hospital were also involved in the racket. The recipients were heavily charged for the same whereas a small amount out of it was paid to the donors," said Mandeep Singh Randhawa, Deputy Commissioner of Police (South-East District)...

Organ Transplant, Donation Draft Law Approved

Khmer TimesKhmer Times | May 29, 2016
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A Dhaka court has granted three-day remand for each of five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate, rejecting bail petition.

Dhaka Metropolitan Magistrate Md Hasibul Haq passed the order on Saturday afternoon after they were produced by DB Inspector Alamgir Hossain Patwari, seeking 10-day remand plea for each of them.

Detectives arrested five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate during drives in different parts of Dhaka.

- See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/law-and-rights/2015/aug/29/5-human-organ-traffickers-put-3-day-remand#sthash.uwQQ346t.dpuf

A Dhaka court has granted three-day remand for each of five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate, rejecting bail petition.

Dhaka Metropolitan Magistrate Md Hasibul Haq passed the order on Saturday afternoon after they were produced by DB Inspector Alamgir Hossain Patwari, seeking 10-day remand plea for each of them.

Detectives arrested five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate during drives in different parts of Dhaka.

- See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/law-and-rights/2015/aug/29/5-human-organ-traffickers-put-3-day-remand#sthash.uwQQ346t.dpuf

The Council of Ministers approved a draft law last week regulating and controlling organ donations and transplants in response to a World Health Organization (WHO) report which revealed that the lives of patients with non-communicable diseases like hypertension and diabetes could be further endangered following kidney transplants, if done improperly.

The draft law also attempts to curb the illegal and brutal organ trade, especially in kidneys.

According to a statement released after a Council of Ministers meeting on Friday, the announcement was made as a result of finding a high incidence of non-communicable diseases such as high blood pressure and diabetes after kidney transplants, especially in countries that have average to high incomes.

“In order to respond to the needed treatment of non-communicable diseases, the medical field has studied research to successfully save the lives of patients. The most common organ that is transplanted is kidneys,” said the statement.

The four main complications which can occur following a kidney transplant are infections, high blood pressure, diabetes and rejection of the donated organ. Most complications occur in the first few months after a transplant, but can develop after many years.

The Ministry of Health press statement added that the imbalance of kidney demand versus the number of kidneys donated has caused rampant trafficking of the organ both domestically and internationally.

“Organ trafficking is globally condemned and curbed by creating laws to manage the donation and transplant of these organs,” it read...

Iraqi families sell organs to overcome poverty

BBC newsBBC News | April 20, 2016
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By Ahemed Maher

Om Hussein is a mother close to breaking point. Along with her husband and their four young children, she is struggling with poverty like millions of other Iraqis.

Her husband, Ali, is unemployed. He is diabetic and has heart problems. She has been the breadwinner for the past nine years, eking out a living as a housemaid. But she is now exhausted, and can no longer work.

"I am tired and we cannot make any money to pay for the rent, medicine, children's needs and food," Ms Hussein said at the family's temporary one bedroom home in eastern Baghdad.

Their dilapidated house collapsed a few months ago, and they have survived thanks to the help of friends and relatives.

Her husband added: "I worked at everything you could think of. As a butcher, a day labourer, a rubbish collector. I would not ask for money, but they would give it to us. I would not ask for food.

"I would tell my son to collect waste bread from the street and we would eat it, but I never asked for food or money."

Facing such poverty, Ms Hussein was driven to make a huge sacrifice.

"I decided to sell my kidney," she said. "I could no longer provide for my family. It was better than selling my body or living on charity."...

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