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Our body parts shouldn’t be for sale

Washington PostThe Washington Post | December 29, 2015
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By Francis Delmonico and Alexander Capron

Organ transplants have extended and improved the lives of more than a million patients over the past 60 years. This is a testament to the dedication and creativity of medical professionals as well as to the generosity of both living and deceased organ donors.

Nonetheless, the rising rate of kidney disease means that some patients won’t get the transplant they’re waiting for. That shortage of organs has led to proposals to lift the prohibition on payment that has been part of U.S. organ donation law since 1984. But buying organs would be wrong. And aside from being wrong, it would also harm existing, voluntary donation programs and be ineffective in increasing the supply of organs. There are better ways to increase the number of organs donated than paying for donations.

 

In recent decades, thousands of organs have been bought from the destitute around the world, for transplantation into the social elite in their own countries or “transplant tourists” from other nations. This has tarnished the reputation of organ transplantation and led to poor medical outcomes. In all countries, it is the poor who sell organs as a way out of their financial straits — usually only temporarily...

 

Maharashtra bars foreigners from organ transplants

Times of IndiaThe Times of India | Dec 19, 2015
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NAGPUR: The state government has amended laws for organ donation and included grandparents and grandchildren in the list of donors. At the same time it has banned extraction of organs of minors and mentally challenged persons.

Announcing the changes in law, medical education minister Vinod Tawde said that now organs donated by Indian citizens can no longer be transplanted in bodies of foreigners. "Other than doctors now trained paramedical staff can also extract eyes from donors. The committee appointed to oversee such transplants under the Act have now been given judicial powers," he added.

The minister further said, "The Human Organ Transplant Act was passed by the central government in 1994 and it was implemented in the state in toto. In order to address challenges arising in the field, the central government amended the act in 2011. The state government decided to incorporate these amendments and also make some changes on its own." ...

Spare organs: Illegal organ transplant market thrives in Pakistan

Pakistan tribune

The Express Tribune | Dec 6, 2015
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By Ferya Ilyas

For nearly 18 years Sameer Kiran lived in fear of an impending renal failure. The Karachi-based physician was diagnosed with an incurable congenital renal disease at the age of 24, and an early detection allowed him to arrange for a life-saving transplant procedure in time. Today, he lives to tell the tale of his battle with the silent disease, not knowing whether his donor was as fortunate.

My doctors said there was nothing I could do and that I just have to wait and watch until the kidneys fail. And they eventually did in 2011,” says Kiran. Unlike the great majority of renal failure cases in Pakistan, Kiran was put on dialysis well before the complete collapse of his kidneys. In the three years that followed, he endured the morbidities of dialysis while searching for a family donor, and came close to death twice. When things started to look bleak, he decided to expand his pool of donors in a desperate attempt to find a match...

Israeli organ smuggler captured in Istanbul

Israeli organ smugglerYeni Şafak | Dec 4, 2015
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Turkish Police detained an Israeli man on Friday wanted by Interpol on charges of organ smuggling and fraud.

He was sent to court after being detained at Istanbul Atatürk Airport; it was determined that he was in Turkey illegally. Interpol among other law enforcement agencies had a red notice out for his arrest.

Wolfman is said to be a major figure in a gang that removes kidneys and other organs from living donors, who often have nothing else of value, and resells them at high prices to others who need transplants. This illegal business is rife with exploitation and unsanitary practices.

Police are now seeking other suspects in connection with an organ-trading ring connected to Wolfman.

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