• POPE EODD EODD 2014 | Oct 9, 2014

    [read the article]


    “Organs trafficking exists because supply and demand are out of balance: if there was more availability of organs, there would be a stop to the illegal trafficking,” So was claimed by Jose A. Nuñez, Medical Officer of the Transplantation Service Delivery and Safety (SDS) of the World Health Organization that has today participated with a delegation of about 80 experts from the Transplantation Committee of the Council of Europe (CD-P-TO) in the general hearing of the Pope, who has once again condemned the illegal sale of organs and stressed that the donation is a testimony of love for our neighbor who must safeguard, however, the certainty of death. European experts have come to Rome for the European Day for Organ Donation which will be celebrated on October 11 with a number of initiatives in several locations of the capital. “Globally, only 10% of patients receive an organ. The formula to reverse this trend is to promote the donation – the WHO expert continued – but at the same time the political authorities should take steps to a tough legislation against trafficking of human beings and organs intended for transplantation. ” ...

  • Costa RicaInside Costa Rica | October 1, 2014

    [read the article]


    Dr. Francisco Mora Palma, the former head of nephrology at the Calderon Guardia Hospital, is facing more than 140 years in prison on charges of illegal organ harvesting and embezzlement, according to an indictment filed with the Criminal Court of San Jose recently obtained by the press.

    Authorities arrested Mora Palma on June 18th, 2013 after an investigation revealed his involvement in an apparent transnational organ trafficking network. 

    Mora Palma faces more than 140 years in prison – 10 years for each of 14 counts – if convicted only on the charges of human trafficking for the purpose of illegal organ harvesting, according to section 172 of the penal code...

     

  • Gobierno de EspanaLa Moncloa | Sep 30, 2014

    [read the article]


    Spain has been chosen to host the opening ceremony for the signing of the Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs. The event will take place in Santiago de Compostela on 24 and 25 March 2015. This has just been announced by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, which named Spain as host in recognition of its world leadership in organ donation and transplantation, and its worldwide efforts to eradicate trafficking in human organs.

    This International Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs is an initiative by the Council of Europe in response to the recommendations made by the Study on Trafficking in Human Organs jointly promoted by the Council of Europe and the United Nations. The Spanish National Transplant Organisation was also involved in drafting this study.

    The Convention calls on governments to classify the buying and selling of human organs as an offence within their national legislation.  It includes measures to protect and compensate the victims, as well as preventive measures such as ensuring transparency and equal access to transplants. Given that trafficking in human organs and transplant tourism is a global problem, the Convention can be signed by both Member States of the Council of Europe and other non-member countries...

  • Chirurghi in udienza dal Papa lanciano SOS contro traffico organi

    Papa meetingLa Stampa | September 21, 2014

    [read the article/leggi l'articolo]


    English translation courtesy of the DICG, click on the link above to access the original article in Italian.

    Rome

    "The Holy Father received in audience Professor Ignazio Marino, the mayor of Rome, with surgeons attending a congress on organ trafficking," the Vatican Press Office declared in a statement.

    According to news agency ANSA, "the mayor Ignazio Marino, himself a former surgeon, did the honours of the house after the audience this morning with Pope Francis."...

     

    Read the complete article in English translation here.

    ****

    Nell corso dell' incontro, che è durato circa 20 minuti, è stato fatto il punto sul problema del traffico internazionale di organi

    roma

    ''Il Santo Padre ha ricevuto in udienza il Professor Ignazio Marino, Sindaco di Roma, con alcuni Chirurghi partecipanti al Congresso sul traffico di organi per trapianto,” informa in una nota la Sala Stampa Vaticana.

    Secondo l’agenzia ANSA, “a fare gli onori di casa è il sindaco Ignazio Marino, anche lui chirurgo, dopo l'udienza di questa mattina con Papa Francesco.”...

  • TribliveTrib Live | September 13 2014
    [read the article]


    More than 200 international patients receive organ transplants in the United States every year, paying top dollar for access to the nation's limited supply of organs.

    Foreign patients compete for organs from deceased donors that would go to the 123,000 citizens awaiting transplants, roughly 6,300 of whom die each year waiting for suitable matches.

    Transplant centers, such as UPMC in Pittsburgh, bill payors as much as $1.2 million apiece for surgeries and follow-up care. Kidney transplants cost the least, averaging $263,000, Seattle-based consulting firm Milliman found. International patients typically pay more to transplant centers than U.S. payors and insurers, experts said...

     
  • NY times Sep1The New York Times | Sep 1, 2014

    [read the article]


    The United States and many other nations are confronting a heart-rending problem: The number of kidneys available for transplants falls far short of the need.

    While some argue that the way to reduce the growing shortage is to pay living donors for kidneys, either in cash or government benefits, there are many ways to increase the supply without paying for human organs, which is prohibited by the 1984 National Organ Transplant Act and generally opposed by the World Health Organization...

     

  •  South China Morning Post

    The South China Morning Post| August 22, 2014

    [read the article]


    Fifteen people involved in the black-market organ trade - including doctors - have been sentenced to prison by a Beijing court for harvesting and selling 51 kidneys, the largest haul in recent mainland history.

    The group's mastermind, Zheng Wei, 46, was sentenced to 12 years in jail by the No 1 Intermediate People's Court on Wednesday, while 14 other members received terms between 3-1/2 years and nine years, the Beijing Times reported. They were charged with coercing people into selling their organs...

  • POPE EODD EODD 2014 | Oct 9, 2014

    [read the article]


    “Organs trafficking exists because supply and demand are out of balance: if there was more availability of organs, there would be a stop to the illegal trafficking,” So was claimed by Jose A. Nuñez, Medical Officer of the Transplantation Service Delivery and Safety (SDS) of the World Health Organization that has today participated with a delegation of about 80 experts from the Transplantation Committee of the Council of Europe (CD-P-TO) in the general hearing of the Pope, who has once again condemned the illegal sale of organs and stressed that the donation is a testimony of love for our neighbor who must safeguard, however, the certainty of death. European experts have come to Rome for the European Day for Organ Donation which will be celebrated on October 11 with a number of initiatives in several locations of the capital. “Globally, only 10% of patients receive an organ. The formula to reverse this trend is to promote the donation – the WHO expert continued – but at the same time the political authorities should take steps to a tough legislation against trafficking of human beings and organs intended for transplantation. ” ...

  • Costa RicaInside Costa Rica | October 1, 2014

    [read the article]


    Dr. Francisco Mora Palma, the former head of nephrology at the Calderon Guardia Hospital, is facing more than 140 years in prison on charges of illegal organ harvesting and embezzlement, according to an indictment filed with the Criminal Court of San Jose recently obtained by the press.

    Authorities arrested Mora Palma on June 18th, 2013 after an investigation revealed his involvement in an apparent transnational organ trafficking network. 

    Mora Palma faces more than 140 years in prison – 10 years for each of 14 counts – if convicted only on the charges of human trafficking for the purpose of illegal organ harvesting, according to section 172 of the penal code...

     

  • Gobierno de EspanaLa Moncloa | Sep 30, 2014

    [read the article]


    Spain has been chosen to host the opening ceremony for the signing of the Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs. The event will take place in Santiago de Compostela on 24 and 25 March 2015. This has just been announced by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, which named Spain as host in recognition of its world leadership in organ donation and transplantation, and its worldwide efforts to eradicate trafficking in human organs.

    This International Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs is an initiative by the Council of Europe in response to the recommendations made by the Study on Trafficking in Human Organs jointly promoted by the Council of Europe and the United Nations. The Spanish National Transplant Organisation was also involved in drafting this study.

    The Convention calls on governments to classify the buying and selling of human organs as an offence within their national legislation.  It includes measures to protect and compensate the victims, as well as preventive measures such as ensuring transparency and equal access to transplants. Given that trafficking in human organs and transplant tourism is a global problem, the Convention can be signed by both Member States of the Council of Europe and other non-member countries...

  • Chirurghi in udienza dal Papa lanciano SOS contro traffico organi

    Papa meetingLa Stampa | September 21, 2014

    [read the article/leggi l'articolo]


    English translation courtesy of the DICG, click on the link above to access the original article in Italian.

    Rome

    "The Holy Father received in audience Professor Ignazio Marino, the mayor of Rome, with surgeons attending a congress on organ trafficking," the Vatican Press Office declared in a statement.

    According to news agency ANSA, "the mayor Ignazio Marino, himself a former surgeon, did the honours of the house after the audience this morning with Pope Francis."...

     

    Read the complete article in English translation here.

    ****

    Nell corso dell' incontro, che è durato circa 20 minuti, è stato fatto il punto sul problema del traffico internazionale di organi

    roma

    ''Il Santo Padre ha ricevuto in udienza il Professor Ignazio Marino, Sindaco di Roma, con alcuni Chirurghi partecipanti al Congresso sul traffico di organi per trapianto,” informa in una nota la Sala Stampa Vaticana.

    Secondo l’agenzia ANSA, “a fare gli onori di casa è il sindaco Ignazio Marino, anche lui chirurgo, dopo l'udienza di questa mattina con Papa Francesco.”...

  • TribliveTrib Live | September 13 2014
    [read the article]


    More than 200 international patients receive organ transplants in the United States every year, paying top dollar for access to the nation's limited supply of organs.

    Foreign patients compete for organs from deceased donors that would go to the 123,000 citizens awaiting transplants, roughly 6,300 of whom die each year waiting for suitable matches.

    Transplant centers, such as UPMC in Pittsburgh, bill payors as much as $1.2 million apiece for surgeries and follow-up care. Kidney transplants cost the least, averaging $263,000, Seattle-based consulting firm Milliman found. International patients typically pay more to transplant centers than U.S. payors and insurers, experts said...

     
  • NY times Sep1The New York Times | Sep 1, 2014

    [read the article]


    The United States and many other nations are confronting a heart-rending problem: The number of kidneys available for transplants falls far short of the need.

    While some argue that the way to reduce the growing shortage is to pay living donors for kidneys, either in cash or government benefits, there are many ways to increase the supply without paying for human organs, which is prohibited by the 1984 National Organ Transplant Act and generally opposed by the World Health Organization...

     

  •  South China Morning Post

    The South China Morning Post| August 22, 2014

    [read the article]


    Fifteen people involved in the black-market organ trade - including doctors - have been sentenced to prison by a Beijing court for harvesting and selling 51 kidneys, the largest haul in recent mainland history.

    The group's mastermind, Zheng Wei, 46, was sentenced to 12 years in jail by the No 1 Intermediate People's Court on Wednesday, while 14 other members received terms between 3-1/2 years and nine years, the Beijing Times reported. They were charged with coercing people into selling their organs...

  •  Cairo Post

    The Cairo Post | August 27, 2014

    [read the article]


    CAIRO — A 16-member gang involved in human organ trafficking activities in the Qalyubia city of Shubra Al Kheima was released from prison on Tuesday evening after ensuring that they’re not a flight risk, al-Masry al-Youm reported.

    They were arrested on August 25, after six out of 16 persons have been arrested on charges of luring others into selling their kidneys in Qalyubia governorate while the other ten persons were accused of selling their kidneys and being involved in this illegal trade...

  • The NY Times Aug17

     The New York Times | August 17, 2014

    [read the article]


    RAMAT GAN, Israel — Aside from the six-figure price tag, what was striking was just how easy it was for Ophira Dorin to buy a kidney.

    Two years ago, as she faced the dispiriting prospect of spending years on dialysis, Ms. Dorin set out to find an organ broker who could help her bypass Israel’s lengthy transplant wait list. Only 36, she had a promising job at a software company and dreams of building a family. To a woman who raced cars for kicks, it seemed unthinkable that her best days might be tethered to a soul-sapping machine.

    For five years, Ms. Dorin had managed her kidney disease by controlling her diet, but it had gradually overrun her resistance. Unable to find a matching donor among family and friends, she faced a daily battle against nausea, exhaustion and depression.

    A broker who trades in human organs might seem a difficult thing to find...

  • the hinduThe Hindu | August 11, 2014
    [read the article]


    The medical community has long been advocating the need to create more awareness for organ donations in the country. Now, going a step further, medical experts have called for reforms in organ retrievals in the context of both living as well as deceased organ donations so that the benefits could reach all who truly need them.

    Dr. Vivekanand Jha of the George Institute for Global Health-India (an organisation working in the area of public health) said: “While paid donations exploit the poor and the vulnerable, deceased donations preferentially end up serving only the well-off. This is a serious human rights issue, which needs to be addressed by the policy-makers.”...

     

  • Cambodia daily mistake  The Cambodia Daily | August 12, 2014

    [read the article]


    After a two-month investigation, police were confident enough to arrest and interrogate nine people on Saturday over an alleged kidney trafficking ring at the state-run Preah Ket Mealea military hospital, including its director Ly Sovann, a lieutenant general in the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF).

    But in an inexplicable about-face Monday, Prum Santhor, deputy Phnom Penh police chief in charge of anti-human trafficking, said all of his department’s work was a “big mistake.”

    Mr. Santhor said that allegations that the hospital was being used as a conduit to remove organs from patients and sell them for tens of thousands of dollars to recipients, a blatant violation of the law, were entirely inaccurate.

    “[The kidney transplants are] legal because they [the organ donors] volunteer,” Mr. Santhor said after reading a prepared statement to reporters in his office at the municipal police commissariat. “No one forces them to do it; there is nothing tricky going on and no cheating going on.”...

     

Spain to host signing of Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs

Gobierno de EspanaLa Moncloa | Sep 30, 2014

[read the article]


Spain has been chosen to host the opening ceremony for the signing of the Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs. The event will take place in Santiago de Compostela on 24 and 25 March 2015. This has just been announced by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe, which named Spain as host in recognition of its world leadership in organ donation and transplantation, and its worldwide efforts to eradicate trafficking in human organs.

This International Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs is an initiative by the Council of Europe in response to the recommendations made by the Study on Trafficking in Human Organs jointly promoted by the Council of Europe and the United Nations. The Spanish National Transplant Organisation was also involved in drafting this study.

The Convention calls on governments to classify the buying and selling of human organs as an offence within their national legislation.  It includes measures to protect and compensate the victims, as well as preventive measures such as ensuring transparency and equal access to transplants. Given that trafficking in human organs and transplant tourism is a global problem, the Convention can be signed by both Member States of the Council of Europe and other non-member countries...

Assessing the likely harms to kidney vendors in regulated organ markets

Screen Shot 2014-09-19 at 11.46.57 am


2014; 14(10): 7-18

Julian Koplin

Advocates of paid living kidney donation frequently argue that kidney sellers would benefit from paid donation under a properly regulated kidney market. The poor outcomes experienced by participants in existing markets are often entirely attributed to harmful black-market practices. This article reviews the medical and anthropological literature on the physical, psychological, social, and financial harms experienced by vendors under Iran's regulated system of donor compensation and black markets throughout the world and argues that this body of research not only documents significant harms to vendors, but also provides reasons to believe that such harms would persist under a regulated system. This does not settle the question of whether or not a regulated market should be introduced, but it does strengthen the case against markets in kidneys while suggesting that those advocating such a system cannot appeal to the purported benefits to vendors to support their case.

Click here to read the full article at The American Journal of Bioethics (subscription required).

Please visit the Ethical analysis and debate page on this website to see commentaries on this paper written or recommended by members of the DICG.

To Achieve National Self-Sufficiency: Recent Progresses in Deceased Donation in Korea

Screen Shot 2014-09-19 at 10.30.35 am


Sang-il Min, Curie Ahn, Duck Jong Han, Soon Il Kim, Sang Young Chung, Suk Koo Lee,
Sung Joo Kim, Oh Jung Kwon, Hong Rae Cho, Shin Hwang, Myoung Soo Kim,
Chul Woo Yang, Jongwon Ha, and Won Hyun Cho

Background. The disparity between patients awaiting transplantation and available organs has widened, and resultant organ shortage became a world crisis. The transplantation community has made considerable progress in national organ donation system in Korea, and significant growth in the number of deceased donors has been witnessed.
Methods. After introduction of the Organ Transplant Act, which was enacted in 2000, transparency was established in organ allocation system in Korea. However, the number of deceased donor dwindled significantly from 162 in 1999 to 36 in 2002. To improve deceased donation, several strategies were pursued, and finally new national organ donation system was established through the amendment of the Organ Transplant Act.
Results. Organ incentive system, which was introduced in 2003, failed to increase the number of deceased donors (68 in 2003, 86 in 2004, and 91 in 2005). Monetary incentive to the bereaved family was introduced in 2006 and slightly increased the number of deceased donor (141 in 2006). However, this effect was not long-lasting (148 in 2007). After enforcement of the new Organ Transplant Act, which included nationwide independent organ procurement organization and mandatory report of potential brain death, the number of deceased donors significantly increased, reaching 368 in 2011. The growth continued and the number of deceased donors reached 409 (8.03 pmp) in 2012.
Conclusion. There has been a significant growth in the number of deceased donors in Korea since the appropriate deceased organ donation system was launched. A comprehensive national program is required to improve deceased donation and achieve self-sufficiency.

Read the full article published ahead of print here (subscription required).

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