• Hindustan TimesHindustan Times | August 10, 2016

    [read the article]


     Five doctors, including the CEO and the medical director of Dr LH Hiranandani hospital in Mumbai, were arrested late on Tuesday night in connection with an alleged attempt for an illegal kidney transplant, believed to be part of a bigger racket.

    Mumbai police investigating the case from last month apprehended CEO Sujeet Chaterjee, medical director Anurag Naik, and doctors Mukesh Shete, Mukesh Shah and Prakash Shetty for medical negligence, taking the total arrests up to 13.

    “Based on the report of appropriate authority today at 8:30pm, the Powai Police arrested the five doctors under section 12 and 21 of the transplantation of human organs act 1994,” said Ashok Dudhe, deputy commissioner of police and spokesperson for Mumbai Police. The accused will be produced before the Andheri magistrate’s court on Wednesday.

    According to a Powai police official, the arrest was based on a three-member state health inquiry committee report that stated a nephrologist and two urologists were negligent on multiple counts.

    Explaining the roles of the doctors, the official said, “They did not verify the documents thoroughly due to which their negligence has occurred. They should not have gone ahead with the surgery till they had satisfactory information that the donor and receipent are related. However, they have had a casual attitude and have not performed their duties properly.”...

     

  • News AustraliaNews Corp Australia Network | August 7, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Sue Dunlevy

    A three-year News Corp investigation has uncovered almost a hundred Australians who have illegally purchased an organ overseas, fearing they would otherwise die waiting here for a legal transplant.

    The unregulated trade is seeing prisoners shot on demand to supply human organs and poor people forced by debt collectors to sell their kidneys for as little as $1000.

    Doctors involved in the trade are charging up to $250,000 per transplant with anaesthetists, nurses, bureaucrats and brokers who source the organ all getting a cut.

    But patients often develop major complications and require expensive follow-up treatment when they return to Australia...

  • Jakarta PostThe Jakarta Post | August 1, 2016
    [read the article]


    President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo said on Saturday he had instructed the National Police to send a special team to investigate rampant human trafficking leading to organ trading in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT). 
    The President gave the instruction to National Police chief Gen. Tito Karnavian after receiving reports of 27 people who had been trafficked to Malaysia and had had their organs taken from their bodies. One of the victims, Yufrida Selan, 14, was sent home dead with her internal organs cut out of her body and stitches along her spine, indicating that her body had been cut open for the procedure. 
    “I’ve asked the National Police chief to pay special attention to this human trafficking case as it involves the organ trade and there were 27 victims,” Jokowi said as quoted by tribunnews.com. 
    Fendy Mugni, a committee member of Pospera, a group of NTT Jokowi supporters during the 2014 presidential election, said that Yufrida’s parents planned to meet Jokowi but the meeting did not happen due to the President’s tight schedule. 
    Jokowi also instructed the police to work with the military to resolve the case.

  • Phnom Penh Post

    The Phnom Penh Post | Jul 1, 2016

    [read the article]


    By B. Sengkong and E. Handley

    The National Assembly yesterday adopted a law banning commercial organ transplants in a bid to curb trafficking in the so-called “red market” trade, introducing heavy jail sentences for breaches.

    The law, which also covers human cells and tissues, stipulates that any donation of human parts must be undertaken on a humanitarian basis – commercial motives and advertising such services are forbidden and carry jail sentences of up to 20 years.

    The legislation’s passage comes two years after a seminal case of organ trafficking in the Kingdom in which Mot Hiriphin was convinced by a cousin that he could sell a kidney to pay off crippling family debt.

    Hiriphin travelled to a Thailand hospital for surgery and received $4,200 for his kidney.

    But lawmakers and law-enforcers yesterday acknowledged a “grey area” that would be difficult to regulate, in which poverty compels victims to give their organs to someone who – while not paying cash for the organ – might provide for the victim in other ways...

  • Harvard forumHuffington Post | May 21, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Casey Williams

    More than 121,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for an organ transplant. Some will sit in limbo for as many as five years before receiving an organ. Others won’t live long enough to reach the top of the waiting list: every day in the U.S., 22 people die while waiting for a live-saving transplant.

    There’s no easy solution to the twin problems of organ scarcity and staggering waiting times for transplants.

    Recruiting more living donors could help shrink wait times. But donating an organ is no easy task. Donors are covered by the recipient’s insurance for the actual procedure but are barred by law from receiving money to cover their travel costs or to pay for their recovery. The hefty financial burden often dissuades would-be donors from contributing their organs.

    Deciding who gets an organ when is tricky business as well. When an organ becomes available, potential recipients who live nearby and whose blood type matches the organ usually get first priority. Hospitals also allocate organs based on how urgently patients need them. But there's still much debate over how best to match and distribute organs.

    In a panel discussion hosted by Harvard’s Chan School of Public Health on Friday, experts will discuss these and other issues...

    Click here to watch this fascinating panel discussion featuring Professor Francis Delmonico, the Senior Advisor to the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group.

  • Pope Vatican Radio TimesVatican Radio| June 3, 2016

    [read the article]


    Pope Francis on Friday evening made an unexpected appearance at the Judges' Summit on Human Trafficking and Organized Crime, a two day conference taking place in the Vatican and organized by the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences.

    Speaking to judges and prosecutors from around the world, the Holy Father asked them "to fulfill their vocation and their crucial mission — to establish justice — without which there is neither order nor sustainable and integral development, nor social peace". He said judges’ unique contribution to humanity is a result of their ‘understanding of indifference and its extreme forms in a globalized world’...

    DICG Senior Advisor Francis Delmonico participated in this meeting of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and the Declaration of Istanbul is cited in the declaration produced as a result of the meeting. To learn more, please click here.

  • The Tribune IndiaThe Tribune | June 4, 2016

    [read the article]


    NEW DELHI - Five persons, including two employees of Apollo Hospital, have been arrested for allegedly running an illegal trade of human organs by luring people from across India to donate their kidneys in exchange for money, police said today.

    The five accused have been identified as Aseem Sikdar (37), who hails from North 24 Pargana, West Bengal, Satya Prakash, alias Ashu (30), who hails from Kanpur, UP, Devashish Moulik (30), who hails from New Jalpaiguri, West Bengal, Aditya Singh (24) from Aali Vihar, Delhi and Shailesh Saxena, alias Sonu (31), who is a resident of Badarpur in Delhi. Aditya and Shailesh have been working as personal secretaries to Apollo Hospital doctors for the past three to four years, said the police.

    On May 30, the police were tipped off that a gang is involved in the illegal trade of human organs. 

    "It was revealed that the gang lured needy people from various parts of the country to donate their kidney in exchange of money. They also prepared forged papers, including the ID proofs, to establish the relationship between the donors and the recipients. It was also revealed that the staff of Apollo Hospital were also involved in the racket. The recipients were heavily charged for the same whereas a small amount out of it was paid to the donors," said Mandeep Singh Randhawa, Deputy Commissioner of Police (South-East District)...

  • Hindustan TimesHindustan Times | August 10, 2016

    [read the article]


     Five doctors, including the CEO and the medical director of Dr LH Hiranandani hospital in Mumbai, were arrested late on Tuesday night in connection with an alleged attempt for an illegal kidney transplant, believed to be part of a bigger racket.

    Mumbai police investigating the case from last month apprehended CEO Sujeet Chaterjee, medical director Anurag Naik, and doctors Mukesh Shete, Mukesh Shah and Prakash Shetty for medical negligence, taking the total arrests up to 13.

    “Based on the report of appropriate authority today at 8:30pm, the Powai Police arrested the five doctors under section 12 and 21 of the transplantation of human organs act 1994,” said Ashok Dudhe, deputy commissioner of police and spokesperson for Mumbai Police. The accused will be produced before the Andheri magistrate’s court on Wednesday.

    According to a Powai police official, the arrest was based on a three-member state health inquiry committee report that stated a nephrologist and two urologists were negligent on multiple counts.

    Explaining the roles of the doctors, the official said, “They did not verify the documents thoroughly due to which their negligence has occurred. They should not have gone ahead with the surgery till they had satisfactory information that the donor and receipent are related. However, they have had a casual attitude and have not performed their duties properly.”...

     

  • News AustraliaNews Corp Australia Network | August 7, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Sue Dunlevy

    A three-year News Corp investigation has uncovered almost a hundred Australians who have illegally purchased an organ overseas, fearing they would otherwise die waiting here for a legal transplant.

    The unregulated trade is seeing prisoners shot on demand to supply human organs and poor people forced by debt collectors to sell their kidneys for as little as $1000.

    Doctors involved in the trade are charging up to $250,000 per transplant with anaesthetists, nurses, bureaucrats and brokers who source the organ all getting a cut.

    But patients often develop major complications and require expensive follow-up treatment when they return to Australia...

  • Jakarta PostThe Jakarta Post | August 1, 2016
    [read the article]


    President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo said on Saturday he had instructed the National Police to send a special team to investigate rampant human trafficking leading to organ trading in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT). 
    The President gave the instruction to National Police chief Gen. Tito Karnavian after receiving reports of 27 people who had been trafficked to Malaysia and had had their organs taken from their bodies. One of the victims, Yufrida Selan, 14, was sent home dead with her internal organs cut out of her body and stitches along her spine, indicating that her body had been cut open for the procedure. 
    “I’ve asked the National Police chief to pay special attention to this human trafficking case as it involves the organ trade and there were 27 victims,” Jokowi said as quoted by tribunnews.com. 
    Fendy Mugni, a committee member of Pospera, a group of NTT Jokowi supporters during the 2014 presidential election, said that Yufrida’s parents planned to meet Jokowi but the meeting did not happen due to the President’s tight schedule. 
    Jokowi also instructed the police to work with the military to resolve the case.

  • Phnom Penh Post

    The Phnom Penh Post | Jul 1, 2016

    [read the article]


    By B. Sengkong and E. Handley

    The National Assembly yesterday adopted a law banning commercial organ transplants in a bid to curb trafficking in the so-called “red market” trade, introducing heavy jail sentences for breaches.

    The law, which also covers human cells and tissues, stipulates that any donation of human parts must be undertaken on a humanitarian basis – commercial motives and advertising such services are forbidden and carry jail sentences of up to 20 years.

    The legislation’s passage comes two years after a seminal case of organ trafficking in the Kingdom in which Mot Hiriphin was convinced by a cousin that he could sell a kidney to pay off crippling family debt.

    Hiriphin travelled to a Thailand hospital for surgery and received $4,200 for his kidney.

    But lawmakers and law-enforcers yesterday acknowledged a “grey area” that would be difficult to regulate, in which poverty compels victims to give their organs to someone who – while not paying cash for the organ – might provide for the victim in other ways...

  • Harvard forumHuffington Post | May 21, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Casey Williams

    More than 121,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for an organ transplant. Some will sit in limbo for as many as five years before receiving an organ. Others won’t live long enough to reach the top of the waiting list: every day in the U.S., 22 people die while waiting for a live-saving transplant.

    There’s no easy solution to the twin problems of organ scarcity and staggering waiting times for transplants.

    Recruiting more living donors could help shrink wait times. But donating an organ is no easy task. Donors are covered by the recipient’s insurance for the actual procedure but are barred by law from receiving money to cover their travel costs or to pay for their recovery. The hefty financial burden often dissuades would-be donors from contributing their organs.

    Deciding who gets an organ when is tricky business as well. When an organ becomes available, potential recipients who live nearby and whose blood type matches the organ usually get first priority. Hospitals also allocate organs based on how urgently patients need them. But there's still much debate over how best to match and distribute organs.

    In a panel discussion hosted by Harvard’s Chan School of Public Health on Friday, experts will discuss these and other issues...

    Click here to watch this fascinating panel discussion featuring Professor Francis Delmonico, the Senior Advisor to the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group.

  • Pope Vatican Radio TimesVatican Radio| June 3, 2016

    [read the article]


    Pope Francis on Friday evening made an unexpected appearance at the Judges' Summit on Human Trafficking and Organized Crime, a two day conference taking place in the Vatican and organized by the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences.

    Speaking to judges and prosecutors from around the world, the Holy Father asked them "to fulfill their vocation and their crucial mission — to establish justice — without which there is neither order nor sustainable and integral development, nor social peace". He said judges’ unique contribution to humanity is a result of their ‘understanding of indifference and its extreme forms in a globalized world’...

    DICG Senior Advisor Francis Delmonico participated in this meeting of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and the Declaration of Istanbul is cited in the declaration produced as a result of the meeting. To learn more, please click here.

  • The Tribune IndiaThe Tribune | June 4, 2016

    [read the article]


    NEW DELHI - Five persons, including two employees of Apollo Hospital, have been arrested for allegedly running an illegal trade of human organs by luring people from across India to donate their kidneys in exchange for money, police said today.

    The five accused have been identified as Aseem Sikdar (37), who hails from North 24 Pargana, West Bengal, Satya Prakash, alias Ashu (30), who hails from Kanpur, UP, Devashish Moulik (30), who hails from New Jalpaiguri, West Bengal, Aditya Singh (24) from Aali Vihar, Delhi and Shailesh Saxena, alias Sonu (31), who is a resident of Badarpur in Delhi. Aditya and Shailesh have been working as personal secretaries to Apollo Hospital doctors for the past three to four years, said the police.

    On May 30, the police were tipped off that a gang is involved in the illegal trade of human organs. 

    "It was revealed that the gang lured needy people from various parts of the country to donate their kidney in exchange of money. They also prepared forged papers, including the ID proofs, to establish the relationship between the donors and the recipients. It was also revealed that the staff of Apollo Hospital were also involved in the racket. The recipients were heavily charged for the same whereas a small amount out of it was paid to the donors," said Mandeep Singh Randhawa, Deputy Commissioner of Police (South-East District)...

  • Khmer TimesKhmer Times | May 29, 2016
    [read the article]


    A Dhaka court has granted three-day remand for each of five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate, rejecting bail petition.

    Dhaka Metropolitan Magistrate Md Hasibul Haq passed the order on Saturday afternoon after they were produced by DB Inspector Alamgir Hossain Patwari, seeking 10-day remand plea for each of them.

    Detectives arrested five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate during drives in different parts of Dhaka.

    - See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/law-and-rights/2015/aug/29/5-human-organ-traffickers-put-3-day-remand#sthash.uwQQ346t.dpuf

    A Dhaka court has granted three-day remand for each of five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate, rejecting bail petition.

    Dhaka Metropolitan Magistrate Md Hasibul Haq passed the order on Saturday afternoon after they were produced by DB Inspector Alamgir Hossain Patwari, seeking 10-day remand plea for each of them.

    Detectives arrested five members of an international human organ trafficking syndicate during drives in different parts of Dhaka.

    - See more at: http://www.dhakatribune.com/law-and-rights/2015/aug/29/5-human-organ-traffickers-put-3-day-remand#sthash.uwQQ346t.dpuf

    The Council of Ministers approved a draft law last week regulating and controlling organ donations and transplants in response to a World Health Organization (WHO) report which revealed that the lives of patients with non-communicable diseases like hypertension and diabetes could be further endangered following kidney transplants, if done improperly.

    The draft law also attempts to curb the illegal and brutal organ trade, especially in kidneys.

    According to a statement released after a Council of Ministers meeting on Friday, the announcement was made as a result of finding a high incidence of non-communicable diseases such as high blood pressure and diabetes after kidney transplants, especially in countries that have average to high incomes.

    “In order to respond to the needed treatment of non-communicable diseases, the medical field has studied research to successfully save the lives of patients. The most common organ that is transplanted is kidneys,” said the statement.

    The four main complications which can occur following a kidney transplant are infections, high blood pressure, diabetes and rejection of the donated organ. Most complications occur in the first few months after a transplant, but can develop after many years.

    The Ministry of Health press statement added that the imbalance of kidney demand versus the number of kidneys donated has caused rampant trafficking of the organ both domestically and internationally.

    “Organ trafficking is globally condemned and curbed by creating laws to manage the donation and transplant of these organs,” it read...

  • BBC newsBBC News | April 20, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Ahemed Maher

    Om Hussein is a mother close to breaking point. Along with her husband and their four young children, she is struggling with poverty like millions of other Iraqis.

    Her husband, Ali, is unemployed. He is diabetic and has heart problems. She has been the breadwinner for the past nine years, eking out a living as a housemaid. But she is now exhausted, and can no longer work.

    "I am tired and we cannot make any money to pay for the rent, medicine, children's needs and food," Ms Hussein said at the family's temporary one bedroom home in eastern Baghdad.

    Their dilapidated house collapsed a few months ago, and they have survived thanks to the help of friends and relatives.

    Her husband added: "I worked at everything you could think of. As a butcher, a day labourer, a rubbish collector. I would not ask for money, but they would give it to us. I would not ask for food.

    "I would tell my son to collect waste bread from the street and we would eat it, but I never asked for food or money."

    Facing such poverty, Ms Hussein was driven to make a huge sacrifice.

    "I decided to sell my kidney," she said. "I could no longer provide for my family. It was better than selling my body or living on charity."...

  • Guardia CivilGuardia Civil | April 11, 2016

    [read the original article in Spanish here/leer en Espanol]


    • The Spanish Civil Guard has detected a Social Security fraud enabling several citizens of Bulgarian to obtain access to dialysis and the waiting list for kidney transplantation.
    • In the Community of Madrid, 14 patients were detected who were fraudulently receiving dialysis or had already received a kidney transplant, resulting in a total cost of more than 1.5 million Euros.
    • The investigation has aborted an illegal medical tourism operation that, had it continued, would have harmed patients on the waiting list for transplants.

    The Civil Guard, as part of operation RENIBUS, has investigated a fraud involving citizens from Eastern Europe, mainly from Bulgaria, who have defrauded Social Security by highly fictitious means, in order to obtain the healthcare card and thus gain access to dialysis treatment and the waiting list for kidney transplantation.

    In the same operation seven fraudulent companies were detected giving foreign workers highly illegal permits, as well as numerous fraudulent contracts in the RETA (Special Scheme for Self-Employed).

    During the investigation, the Guardia Civil has enjoyed the cooperation of the National Transplant Organization, the Ministry of Employment and Social Security, and other agencies under the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality and the Ministry of Health of the Madrid's community.

    The operation began after a complaint was received from the Regional Office for the Coordination of Transplants under the Ministry of Health of the Community of Madrid, in which an unusual increase in patients from Eastern Europe on waiting lists for kidney transplants was reported.

    The agents found a large number of cases in which people of other nationalities were fraudulently accessing the organ transplant list, an increase that was driven by word of mouth in Bulgaria, influenced by the excellent international reputation of the National Health System and in particular the Spanish Transplant System.

    These people traveled to Spain and sought consultation in a health center, saying they were on vacation or visiting a relative, requesting hemodialysis treatment, which is offered as a medical emergency. In some cases, individuals presented to hospital on the day of their arrival in our country...

    Read more via Google Translate here.

  • Ahmedabad MirrorAhmedabad Mirror | March 16, 2016

    [read the article]


    By

    A thick silence suffocates Pandoli village. The villagers have not got over the shock of finding that 13 men from the village had sold their kidneys illegally to fulfil their basic needs for food, medicines and security. What is worse is that there could be more victims of the kidney scam from the village. Mirror visited the village which has a population of 15,204 residents, and about 4,000 families live below poverty line. Making a mockery of the Gujarat development model, the village falls in Anand district which lies in the affluent NRG-rich belt of Charotar.

    The victims are mostly debt-ridden farmers and daily wage workers who allegedly sold their kidneys to hospitals in New Delhi and Sri Lanka. The racket, which has been reportedly running for over 15 years since 2001, came to light on Monday after police receiving a tip-off that around 80 villagers had sold their kidneys...

Obtaining consensus regarding international transplantation continues to be difficult for pediatric centers in the United States

Screen Shot 2016-08-09 at 1.41.23 PM


2016; Epub 31st July

Lorts A, Ryan TD, Matheny Antommaria, AH, Lake M, & Bucuvalas J. 

Abstract:

Organ transplant is life-saving and any given organ may be valuable to a multitude of potential recipients. An allocation system must be used to reconcile the difference between supply and demand, and this system must take into account the impact that accepting international patients may have on the local system. The principles for allocation must be clear, equitable, provide utility and must be monitored so as to maintain public trust. The impact of the system on metrics deemed to be critical must be measured. Finally, strategies must take into account the local culture, size of the region to be supported, the number and experience of transplant centers, and the resources of the healthcare delivery system. Our focus is on the United States, recognizing that strategies and challenges may vary across countries.

Click here to read the complete article courtesy of Pediatric Transplantation.

Statement of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group Regarding Payments to Families of Deceased Organ Donors.

 

Transplantation Journal

AM Capron, FL Delmonico, B Domínguez-Gil, D Martin, GM Danovitch, and JR Chapman

2016; Epub June 28

Abstract:

Governmental and private programs that pay next of kin who give permission for the removal of their deceased relative's organs for transplantation exist in a number of countries. Such payments, which may be given to the relatives or paid directly for funeral expenses or hospital bills unrelated to being a donor, aim to increase the rate of donation. The Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group-in alignment with the World Health Organization Guiding Principles and the Council of Europe Convention Against Trafficking in Human Organs-has adopted a new policy statement opposing such practices.

Payment programs are unwise because they produce a lower rate of donations than in countries with voluntary, unpaid programs; associate deceased donation with being poor and marginal in society; undermine public trust in the determination of death; and raise doubts about fair allocation of organs. Most important, allowing families to receive money for donation from a deceased person, who is at no risk of harm, will make it impossible to sustain prohibitions on paying living donors, who are at risk.

Payment programs are also unethical. Tying coverage for funeral expenses or healthcare costs to a family allowing organs to be procured is exploitative, not "charitable." Using payment to overcome reluctance to donate based on cultural or religious beliefs especially offends principles of liberty and dignity. Finally, while it is appropriate to make donation "financially neutral"-by reimbursing the added medical costs of evaluating and maintaining a patient as a potential donor-such reimbursement may never be conditioned on a family agreeing to donate.

To read and download this open access article, please click here.

 

Trade in kidneys is ethically intolerable

D.E. Martin


Indian Journal Medical Ethics

2016; Epub May 9

Abstract: In India, as in most countries where trade in human organs is legally prohibited, policies governing transplantation from living donors are designed to identify and exclude prospective donors who have a commercial interest in donation. The effective implementation of such policies requires resources, training and motivation on the part of health professionals responsible for organ procurement and transplantation. If professionals are unconvinced by or unfamiliar with the ethical justi cation of the relevant laws and policies, they may fail to perform a robust evaluation of prospective donors and transplant candidates, and to act on suspicions or evidence of illicit activities. I comment here on a recent paper by Aggarwal and Adhikary (2016), in which the authors imply that tolerance of illicit commercialism in living kidney donation programmes is not unreasonable, given the insuf ciency of kidneys available for transplantation. I argue that such tolerance is unethical not only because of the harmful consequences of kidney traf cking, but because professional tolerance of commercialism undermines public trust in organ procurement programmes and impairs the development of sustainable donation and transplant systems.

Read the complete paper here, courtesy of the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics.

Read the paper by Aggarwal and Adhikary here, courtesy of the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics.

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