• La Nacion Costa RicaLa Nacion | February 15, 2015

    [leer el artículo en español/

    read in English via Google Translate]


    By Ángela Ávalos R

    Cinco hospitales fueron seleccionados por la CCSS para identificar potenciales donadores de órganos entre los pacientes que fallezcan, lo que podría salvar la vida de otros que esperan trasplantes.

    Los centros elegidos son Max Peralta (Cartago), Escalante Pradilla (Pérez Zeledón), San Rafael (Alajuela), San Vicente de Paúl (Heredia), y Enrique Baltodano (Liberia).

    No se descarta integrar a esa lista al Tony Facio (Limón) y al Monseñor Sanabria (Puntarenas), en el futuro cercano.

    La selección se basó en la capacidad que tienen esos cinco hospitales de diagnosticar y mantener un donante cadavérico, explicó el coordinador de trasplantes en la Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (CCSS), Marvin Agüero Chinchilla.

    Estos centros cuentan con ventilador mecánico para conservar el cadáver oxigenado. También pueden diagnosticar la muerte cerebral, pues tienen neurólogo o neurocirujano. La estrategia, denominada hospital donante, es parte de la ejecución del modelo Red Nacional de Donación y Trasplantes, de la Caja.

     

    Five hospitals were selected by the CCSS to identify potential organ donors among patients who die, which could save the lives of others waiting for transplants. The selected centers are Max Peralta (Carthage), Escalante Pradilla (Perez Zeledon), San Rafael (Alajuela), San Vicente de Paul (Heredia), and Enrique Baltodano (Liberia). It is not excluded that Tony Facio (Limón) and Monsignor Sanabria (Puntarenas) will join that list in the near future.

    The selection was based on the ability of these five hospitals to diagnose and maintain a deceased donor, said the transplant coordinator at the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (CCSS), Marvin Chinchilla Agüero.

    These centers have mechanical ventilators to keep the body oxygenated. They can also diagnose brain death, as they have a neurologist or neurosurgeon. The strategy, called donor hospital, is part of the implementation of the National Donation and Transplant Network model of the Fund...

  • Telegraph IraqThe Telegraph | February 18, 2015

    [read the article]


    Iraq's ambassador to the United Nations asked the Security Council on Tuesday to look at allegations that the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isil) is using organ harvesting as a way to finance its operations.

    Ambassador Mohamed Alhakim told reporters that in the past few weeks, bodies with surgical incisions and missing kidneys or other body parts have been found in shallow mass graves.

    "We have bodies. Come and examine them," he said. "It is clear they are missing certain parts."

    He also said a dozen doctors had been "executed" in Mosul for refusing to participate in organ harvesting.

    Mr Alhakim briefed the council on the overall situation in Iraq and accused Isil of "crimes of genocide" in targeting certain ethnic groups...

     

  • Times of IndiaThe Times of India | Feb 8, 2015

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    JAIPUR: At a tender age of 6, a boy from rural area of the state scripted history. He became the first cadaver donor (organs from brain dead people donated to other patients) in the state. His vital organs - liver and kidney were harvested in Mahatma Gandhi Hospital, Jaipur, where he was undergoing treatment for an injury he suffered on January 30. Before he died, he saved lives of persons who could survive only by liver and kidney transplant.

    While the kidney transplant was done at a private hospital in Jaipur, the liver was ferried through a green corridor created between Jaipur and Delhi and the organ was donated to a youth in Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences (ILBS)...

     

  • Times of India Jan2015The Times of India | January 28, 2015

    [read the article]


    By Sushmi Dey

    NEW DELHI: Lakhs of foreigners thronging India every year seeking organ transplantation may find it more difficult now. In an attempt to step up safeguards against misuse, the government has mandated that allocation of organs be made in a specified sequence giving preference to Indians over foreigners.

    However, the medical fraternity has opposed the move alleging this will force doctors to differentiate between patients based on region and nationality, which is a violation of the Medical Council of India (MCI) Act...

  • JRC at SMHSydney Morning Herald | January 26, 2015

    [read the article]


    By Rose Powell

    If Jeremy Chapman had scored only a few marks lower in his final high school exams, the world would have lost an internationally acclaimed doctor who has saved thousands of lives. Because before dedicating his life to kidney transplantation and ethical organ donation advocacy, he was ready to spend his years as a fruit farmer.

    "I would have enjoyed farming, but I've loved medicine. All research betters outcomes for the human race, but medicine is the most direct way that science improves the lives of people," Dr Chapman said.

    Dr Chapman, now the director of medicine and cancer at Westmead Hospital, has been recognised by the government for his contribution to medicine.

    He has been appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia to honour his pioneering work developing practices about organ donations and transplants.

    Originally from England, the now 60-year-old doctor moved to Australia in 1987. He told Fairfax Media he was drawn to the niche field of kidney transplants because of the promise of the emerging field...

  • Pakistan The Nation The Nation | January 11, 2015

    [read the article]


    RAWALPINDI - Police swooped down a private hospital in Gulzar-e-Quaid and arrested seven persons including a surgeon and an anaesthetist for their alleged involvement in illegal transplantation of kidneys on Saturday.
    Police also took four people, including a foreigner, into custody who were present in the private hospital for kidney’s transplantation. A kidney and other surgical instruments were also seized by police while the patients were sent to Benazir Bhutto Hospital for medical treatment.
    According to Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) Civil Line Circle Farhan Aslam, a police team led by Station House Officer (SHO) Police Station Airport Wasim Faraz conducted a raid on a private hospital “Hira Hospital” located in Commercial Centre at Gulzar-e-Quaid and held seven people including two senior doctors engaged in illegal kidney transplantation.
    He said that police also recovered four people including a foreigner from the hospital who were there for kidney selling and transplantation. The accused were shifted to police station for questioning whereas the patients were sent to BBH for medical treatment. Police sealed the hospital and took all the equipment and record in custody, DSP Farhan added...

  •  China Daily USA
    China Daily USA| Jan 8, 2015

    [read the article]


    By Chris Davis

    Every year in China there are about 300,000 patients who need an organ transplant but only about 10,000 surgeries are performed. That according to Huang Jiefu, former vice-minister of health.

    There are a number of reasons for the shortfall. The main one is that Chinese people are much less willing than other populations to donate their organs after death. Huang estimates that six out of 10,000,000 people in China donate, where as in a country like Spain the figure is 370.

    In most countries, demand for transplanted organs heavily outstrips supply. But China also faces other barriers. As the current issue of the Lancet reports, "Culturally, the concept of organ donation contradicts the traditional Confucian view that one is born with a complete body, which should end the same way because the body, hair, and skin are gifts from parents."

    In 1984 it became legal in China to harvest organs from executed prisoners with their families' consent, a practice that was immediately condemned by international human rights and medical groups. Ethical concerns centered on the possibility of coercion or corruption in the allocation process. A black market developed...

    To read more about organ procurement and transplantation in China, click here.

  • La Nacion Costa RicaLa Nacion | February 15, 2015

    [leer el artículo en español/

    read in English via Google Translate]


    By Ángela Ávalos R

    Cinco hospitales fueron seleccionados por la CCSS para identificar potenciales donadores de órganos entre los pacientes que fallezcan, lo que podría salvar la vida de otros que esperan trasplantes.

    Los centros elegidos son Max Peralta (Cartago), Escalante Pradilla (Pérez Zeledón), San Rafael (Alajuela), San Vicente de Paúl (Heredia), y Enrique Baltodano (Liberia).

    No se descarta integrar a esa lista al Tony Facio (Limón) y al Monseñor Sanabria (Puntarenas), en el futuro cercano.

    La selección se basó en la capacidad que tienen esos cinco hospitales de diagnosticar y mantener un donante cadavérico, explicó el coordinador de trasplantes en la Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (CCSS), Marvin Agüero Chinchilla.

    Estos centros cuentan con ventilador mecánico para conservar el cadáver oxigenado. También pueden diagnosticar la muerte cerebral, pues tienen neurólogo o neurocirujano. La estrategia, denominada hospital donante, es parte de la ejecución del modelo Red Nacional de Donación y Trasplantes, de la Caja.

     

    Five hospitals were selected by the CCSS to identify potential organ donors among patients who die, which could save the lives of others waiting for transplants. The selected centers are Max Peralta (Carthage), Escalante Pradilla (Perez Zeledon), San Rafael (Alajuela), San Vicente de Paul (Heredia), and Enrique Baltodano (Liberia). It is not excluded that Tony Facio (Limón) and Monsignor Sanabria (Puntarenas) will join that list in the near future.

    The selection was based on the ability of these five hospitals to diagnose and maintain a deceased donor, said the transplant coordinator at the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (CCSS), Marvin Chinchilla Agüero.

    These centers have mechanical ventilators to keep the body oxygenated. They can also diagnose brain death, as they have a neurologist or neurosurgeon. The strategy, called donor hospital, is part of the implementation of the National Donation and Transplant Network model of the Fund...

  • Telegraph IraqThe Telegraph | February 18, 2015

    [read the article]


    Iraq's ambassador to the United Nations asked the Security Council on Tuesday to look at allegations that the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isil) is using organ harvesting as a way to finance its operations.

    Ambassador Mohamed Alhakim told reporters that in the past few weeks, bodies with surgical incisions and missing kidneys or other body parts have been found in shallow mass graves.

    "We have bodies. Come and examine them," he said. "It is clear they are missing certain parts."

    He also said a dozen doctors had been "executed" in Mosul for refusing to participate in organ harvesting.

    Mr Alhakim briefed the council on the overall situation in Iraq and accused Isil of "crimes of genocide" in targeting certain ethnic groups...

     

  • Times of IndiaThe Times of India | Feb 8, 2015

    [read the article]


    JAIPUR: At a tender age of 6, a boy from rural area of the state scripted history. He became the first cadaver donor (organs from brain dead people donated to other patients) in the state. His vital organs - liver and kidney were harvested in Mahatma Gandhi Hospital, Jaipur, where he was undergoing treatment for an injury he suffered on January 30. Before he died, he saved lives of persons who could survive only by liver and kidney transplant.

    While the kidney transplant was done at a private hospital in Jaipur, the liver was ferried through a green corridor created between Jaipur and Delhi and the organ was donated to a youth in Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences (ILBS)...

     

  • Times of India Jan2015The Times of India | January 28, 2015

    [read the article]


    By Sushmi Dey

    NEW DELHI: Lakhs of foreigners thronging India every year seeking organ transplantation may find it more difficult now. In an attempt to step up safeguards against misuse, the government has mandated that allocation of organs be made in a specified sequence giving preference to Indians over foreigners.

    However, the medical fraternity has opposed the move alleging this will force doctors to differentiate between patients based on region and nationality, which is a violation of the Medical Council of India (MCI) Act...

  • JRC at SMHSydney Morning Herald | January 26, 2015

    [read the article]


    By Rose Powell

    If Jeremy Chapman had scored only a few marks lower in his final high school exams, the world would have lost an internationally acclaimed doctor who has saved thousands of lives. Because before dedicating his life to kidney transplantation and ethical organ donation advocacy, he was ready to spend his years as a fruit farmer.

    "I would have enjoyed farming, but I've loved medicine. All research betters outcomes for the human race, but medicine is the most direct way that science improves the lives of people," Dr Chapman said.

    Dr Chapman, now the director of medicine and cancer at Westmead Hospital, has been recognised by the government for his contribution to medicine.

    He has been appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia to honour his pioneering work developing practices about organ donations and transplants.

    Originally from England, the now 60-year-old doctor moved to Australia in 1987. He told Fairfax Media he was drawn to the niche field of kidney transplants because of the promise of the emerging field...

  • Pakistan The Nation The Nation | January 11, 2015

    [read the article]


    RAWALPINDI - Police swooped down a private hospital in Gulzar-e-Quaid and arrested seven persons including a surgeon and an anaesthetist for their alleged involvement in illegal transplantation of kidneys on Saturday.
    Police also took four people, including a foreigner, into custody who were present in the private hospital for kidney’s transplantation. A kidney and other surgical instruments were also seized by police while the patients were sent to Benazir Bhutto Hospital for medical treatment.
    According to Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) Civil Line Circle Farhan Aslam, a police team led by Station House Officer (SHO) Police Station Airport Wasim Faraz conducted a raid on a private hospital “Hira Hospital” located in Commercial Centre at Gulzar-e-Quaid and held seven people including two senior doctors engaged in illegal kidney transplantation.
    He said that police also recovered four people including a foreigner from the hospital who were there for kidney selling and transplantation. The accused were shifted to police station for questioning whereas the patients were sent to BBH for medical treatment. Police sealed the hospital and took all the equipment and record in custody, DSP Farhan added...

  •  China Daily USA
    China Daily USA| Jan 8, 2015

    [read the article]


    By Chris Davis

    Every year in China there are about 300,000 patients who need an organ transplant but only about 10,000 surgeries are performed. That according to Huang Jiefu, former vice-minister of health.

    There are a number of reasons for the shortfall. The main one is that Chinese people are much less willing than other populations to donate their organs after death. Huang estimates that six out of 10,000,000 people in China donate, where as in a country like Spain the figure is 370.

    In most countries, demand for transplanted organs heavily outstrips supply. But China also faces other barriers. As the current issue of the Lancet reports, "Culturally, the concept of organ donation contradicts the traditional Confucian view that one is born with a complete body, which should end the same way because the body, hair, and skin are gifts from parents."

    In 1984 it became legal in China to harvest organs from executed prisoners with their families' consent, a practice that was immediately condemned by international human rights and medical groups. Ethical concerns centered on the possibility of coercion or corruption in the allocation process. A black market developed...

    To read more about organ procurement and transplantation in China, click here.

  • Al MonitorAl Monitor | December 5, 2014

    [read the article]


    The success of the Islamic State (IS) in sustaining its battles on more than one front in both Syria and Iraq, while fighting in several other countries, highlights that the group has multiple and significant sources of funding.

    According to data, there are two funding sources: internal and external. The latter includes a wide variety of funding schemes, including through medical facilities, oil and human trafficking mafias. According to sources in Mosul, the money supplied internally is allocated to local and foreign fighters, to encourage them to join up and continue fighting. IS took control of Mosul in June and then expanded in August to control large swaths of the country.

    Residents of Mosul say that the sale of oil extracted from wells controlled by the organization in both Iraq and Syria has provided a sustained source of funding. The organization also opened trade canals through Kurdish [territories in] Iraq and Turkey, with the help of Kurdish, Turkish and Iranian traders.

    In addition to oil sales, a secondary source of funding stems from the imposition of royalties on residents in IS territories. Members of the organization collect 50,000 dinars [$41.60] from each family as service and protection fees. The amount doubles for families whose sons did not join IS. One of the prominent tribal figures in Nineveh province, Sheikh Mohammad Abu Thayyab, said, “The IS gangs imposed 50,000 dinars worth of royalties on every family if one of their sons did not join these terrorists.”

    Sources in the city say that oil prices have skyrocketed. The price of gas tanks used for cooking has reached 75,000 dinars, [about $62] while coal oil is sold at 5,000 dinars a liter [$4.16]. Meanwhile, the price of food has quadrupled.

    The third funding source was exposed by otolaryngologist Siruwan al-Mosuli. He said that lately he noticed unusual movement within medical facilities in Mosul. Arab and foreign surgeons were hired, but prohibited from mixing with local doctors. Information then leaked about organ selling. Surgeries take place within a hospital and organs are quickly transported through networks specialized in trafficking human organs. Mosuli said that the organs come from fallen fighters who were quickly transported to the hospital, injured people who were abandoned or individuals who were kidnapped.

    He said that organ sales yield large profits. A specialized mafia is engaged in these operations, in addition to medical institutions working in other countries. Without coordination among these parties, such a trade cannot be sustained, he said. According to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), the organization sells bodies and organs of injured people they arrest...

     
  • Strait Times Dec 14The Straits Times | December 14, 2014
    [read the article]


    By Rachel Chang

    BEIJING - Madam Chen Xiu's kidneys have been failing for 12 years.

    While the 52-year-old former gynaecologist's life is now dominated by thrice-weekly dialysis sessions that cost 800 yuan (S$170) each time, she refuses to have her husband or her three children - aged 14, 15 and 24 - donate their kidneys to her.

    "She thinks that our health will suffer and she won't allow it," said eldest daughter Chen Lili, an administrative assistant in Shaanxi province where the family lives. "So we just keep waiting for a kidney to come from somewhere."

    Such a mindset is at the root of a longstanding organ shortage in China, where about 300,000 patients are in need of organs every year, but only 10,000 transplants are carried out.

    The dire state of affairs is about to get much worse. About a week ago, China announced it will stop its controversial practice of transplanting organs from executed prisoners from Jan 1 next year. This came after years of procrastination...

    Read the complete article here.

    Read the DICG statement commenting on news of the policy change in China here.

  • Screen Shot 2014-12-14 at 1.54.49 pm

    Media reports announcing an end to the use of organs from executed prisoners in China are misleading

    December 13, 2014

    Evidently relying upon statements made during a plenum of the Chinese State Council in October 2014, international media have reported that the Chinese government has promised that organs for transplantation will no longer be obtained from executed prisoners as of January 1, 2015.1,2 The Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) welcomes this announcement and applauds the leadership of Chinese colleagues to accomplish this objective, but for several reasons remains skeptical about the promised timeline.

    First, the announcement was not accompanied by formal assurance that the Hangzhou Resolution, developed by Chinese transplant professionals and government officials in 2013, is indeed being implemented.3 The objectives of the Hangzhou Resolution include:

    • establishing credentials for Chinese transplant professionals,
    • banning the sale or purchase of human organs,
    • preventing organ trafficking and transplant tourism, and
    • treating transplantable organs as a national resource for Chinese patients...

    Read the complete statement here.

  • Pakistan tribuneThe Express Tribune | Dec 10, 2014
    [read the article]


    By Ishrat Ansari

    KARACHI: The recent case of human trafficking for illegal organ transplant worries Dr Adeeb Rizvi, who fears this trade will thrive unless the culprits are punished.

    “The government needs to charge those two men arrested from Jinnah International Airport,” said the SIUT founding director at a press briefing organised by the Transplantation Society of Pakistan (TSP) in collaboration with Sindh Human Organ and Tissue Transplantation Authority (Hota) at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT) on Wednesday.

    A couple of decades ago, Pakistan was the largest market for the trafficking of human organs in the world, Dr Rizvi pointed out. The selling and buying of human organs is against Islam and is also illegal, he added.

    For their part, the monitoring committee of the transplantation society has requested the health secretary, Iqbal Hussain Durrani, to file a complaint against the two men, Rizwan Ahmed and Sarfaraz Bhatti, who were caught on their way to Mauritius via Dubai. They were planning to go to India through this route for an illegal kidney transplant...

Organ donation in Israel: Achievements and Challenges

Ashkenazi, T., Lavee, J., Mor, E. 


Transplantation

2015; 99(2):265-6

 

Israel's organ transplantation history dates back to 1964 when the first kidney transplantation from a living related donor was performed; the first kidney transplantation from a deceased donor followed in 1965. Currently, organ transplantations are performed in 6 Israeli medical centers with 6 kidney, 3 liver, 3 heart, and 2 lung transplantation programs.

Read the complete report at Transplantation here (subscription required).

 

Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation: Recommendations to Optimize Education, Access, and Care


D. LaPointe Rudow, R. Hays, P. Baliga, D. J. Cohen, M. Cooper, G. M. Danovitch, M. A. Dew, E. J. Gordon, D. A. Mandelbrot, S. McGuire, J. Milton, D. R. Moore, M. Morgievich, J. D. Schold, D. L. Segev, D. Serur, R. W. Steiner, J. C. Tan, A. D. Waterman, E. Y. Zavala and J. R. Rodrigue

AJT

Article first published online: 3 FEB 2015, DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13173

Abstract

Live donor kidney transplantation is the best treatment option for most patients with late-stage chronic kidney disease; however, the rate of living kidney donation has declined in the United States. A consensus conference was held June 5–6, 2014 to identify best practices and knowledge gaps pertaining to live donor kidney transplantation and living kidney donation. Transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders discussed processes for educating transplant candidates and potential living donors about living kidney donation; efficiencies in the living donor evaluation process; disparities in living donation; and financial and systemic barriers to living donation. We summarize the consensus recommendations for best practices in these educational and clinical domains, future research priorities, and possible public policy initiatives to remove barriers to living kidney donation.

Read the complete article here (subscription to AJT required).

Dr Jeremy Chapman receives Australia Day honour

JRC at SMHSydney Morning Herald | January 26, 2015

[read the article]


By Rose Powell

If Jeremy Chapman had scored only a few marks lower in his final high school exams, the world would have lost an internationally acclaimed doctor who has saved thousands of lives. Because before dedicating his life to kidney transplantation and ethical organ donation advocacy, he was ready to spend his years as a fruit farmer.

"I would have enjoyed farming, but I've loved medicine. All research betters outcomes for the human race, but medicine is the most direct way that science improves the lives of people," Dr Chapman said.

Dr Chapman, now the director of medicine and cancer at Westmead Hospital, has been recognised by the government for his contribution to medicine.

He has been appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia to honour his pioneering work developing practices about organ donations and transplants.

Originally from England, the now 60-year-old doctor moved to Australia in 1987. He told Fairfax Media he was drawn to the niche field of kidney transplants because of the promise of the emerging field...

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