• The NY Times Aug17

     The New York Times | August 17, 2014

    [read the article]


    RAMAT GAN, Israel — Aside from the six-figure price tag, what was striking was just how easy it was for Ophira Dorin to buy a kidney.

    Two years ago, as she faced the dispiriting prospect of spending years on dialysis, Ms. Dorin set out to find an organ broker who could help her bypass Israel’s lengthy transplant wait list. Only 36, she had a promising job at a software company and dreams of building a family. To a woman who raced cars for kicks, it seemed unthinkable that her best days might be tethered to a soul-sapping machine.

    For five years, Ms. Dorin had managed her kidney disease by controlling her diet, but it had gradually overrun her resistance. Unable to find a matching donor among family and friends, she faced a daily battle against nausea, exhaustion and depression.

    A broker who trades in human organs might seem a difficult thing to find...

  • the hinduThe Hindu | August 11, 2014
    [read the article]


    The medical community has long been advocating the need to create more awareness for organ donations in the country. Now, going a step further, medical experts have called for reforms in organ retrievals in the context of both living as well as deceased organ donations so that the benefits could reach all who truly need them.

    Dr. Vivekanand Jha of the George Institute for Global Health-India (an organisation working in the area of public health) said: “While paid donations exploit the poor and the vulnerable, deceased donations preferentially end up serving only the well-off. This is a serious human rights issue, which needs to be addressed by the policy-makers.”...

     

  • Cambodia daily mistake  The Cambodia Daily | August 12, 2014

    [read the article]


    After a two-month investigation, police were confident enough to arrest and interrogate nine people on Saturday over an alleged kidney trafficking ring at the state-run Preah Ket Mealea military hospital, including its director Ly Sovann, a lieutenant general in the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF).

    But in an inexplicable about-face Monday, Prum Santhor, deputy Phnom Penh police chief in charge of anti-human trafficking, said all of his department’s work was a “big mistake.”

    Mr. Santhor said that allegations that the hospital was being used as a conduit to remove organs from patients and sell them for tens of thousands of dollars to recipients, a blatant violation of the law, were entirely inaccurate.

    “[The kidney transplants are] legal because they [the organ donors] volunteer,” Mr. Santhor said after reading a prepared statement to reporters in his office at the municipal police commissariat. “No one forces them to do it; there is nothing tricky going on and no cheating going on.”...

     

  • Shanghai DailyThe Shanghai Daily | August 11, 2014

    [read the article]


    HUMAN kidneys were labeled as seafood when sent from Nanchang, capital of east China’s Jiangxi Province, to Guangzhou, The Beijing News reported as it revealed details of a trade that led to 12 people being sent to prison last month.

    The kidneys were stored in a refrigerated container before being flown south to the Guangdong Province capital. One of the gang, Mo Yongqing, said airport security were told it was frozen seafood, something he said that worked every time.

    Mo, 32, was among those sentenced to between two years and nine and a half years in prison last month at Qingshanhu District People’s Court in Nanchang...

     

  • The Phnom Penh PostThe Phnom Penh Post | August 11, 2014
    [read the article]


    Police on Saturday busted an alleged organ-trafficking ring operating out of a military hospital in Phnom Penh, a ring they say included medical professionals working there and two generals from the Ministry of Defence.

    It is the second group of arrests purportedly connected to the illegal organ trade in as many months.

    According to a statement released by the Municipal Anti-Human Trafficking and Juvenile Protection Office, the group stands accused of “human trafficking with intent and being the accomplices of human trafficking with intent”...

  • Times of India Bengal The Times of India | August 7, 2014

    [read the article]


    KOLKATA: The CID has unearthed a racket in which poor people from four Bengal districts "donated" their kidneys to patients in Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan.

    This comes close on the heels of the detective department unearthing another such racket where poor people from Punjab and Chhattisgarh were brought to the city for "donating" their kidneys in lieu of cash.

    Lalbazar detectives had found how the "poorest of the poor" from Punjab and Chhattisgarh were promised Rs 10,000-70,000 for a kidney and brought to Kolkata as donors using loopholes in organ transplantation laws...

  • Tasnim news agency

    Tasnim News Agency | August 5, 2014
    [read the article]


    TEHRAN (Tasnim) – Iran’s intelligence forces have identified and disbanded a major ring involved in human organ trafficking activities.

    In a statement released on Tuesday, the ministry said seven members of the band have been arrested with the cooperation of the Judiciary body.

    It said the arrested members of the band have confessed to forging identification documents to gain their illicit objectives...

  • The NY Times Aug17

     The New York Times | August 17, 2014

    [read the article]


    RAMAT GAN, Israel — Aside from the six-figure price tag, what was striking was just how easy it was for Ophira Dorin to buy a kidney.

    Two years ago, as she faced the dispiriting prospect of spending years on dialysis, Ms. Dorin set out to find an organ broker who could help her bypass Israel’s lengthy transplant wait list. Only 36, she had a promising job at a software company and dreams of building a family. To a woman who raced cars for kicks, it seemed unthinkable that her best days might be tethered to a soul-sapping machine.

    For five years, Ms. Dorin had managed her kidney disease by controlling her diet, but it had gradually overrun her resistance. Unable to find a matching donor among family and friends, she faced a daily battle against nausea, exhaustion and depression.

    A broker who trades in human organs might seem a difficult thing to find...

  • the hinduThe Hindu | August 11, 2014
    [read the article]


    The medical community has long been advocating the need to create more awareness for organ donations in the country. Now, going a step further, medical experts have called for reforms in organ retrievals in the context of both living as well as deceased organ donations so that the benefits could reach all who truly need them.

    Dr. Vivekanand Jha of the George Institute for Global Health-India (an organisation working in the area of public health) said: “While paid donations exploit the poor and the vulnerable, deceased donations preferentially end up serving only the well-off. This is a serious human rights issue, which needs to be addressed by the policy-makers.”...

     

  • Cambodia daily mistake  The Cambodia Daily | August 12, 2014

    [read the article]


    After a two-month investigation, police were confident enough to arrest and interrogate nine people on Saturday over an alleged kidney trafficking ring at the state-run Preah Ket Mealea military hospital, including its director Ly Sovann, a lieutenant general in the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF).

    But in an inexplicable about-face Monday, Prum Santhor, deputy Phnom Penh police chief in charge of anti-human trafficking, said all of his department’s work was a “big mistake.”

    Mr. Santhor said that allegations that the hospital was being used as a conduit to remove organs from patients and sell them for tens of thousands of dollars to recipients, a blatant violation of the law, were entirely inaccurate.

    “[The kidney transplants are] legal because they [the organ donors] volunteer,” Mr. Santhor said after reading a prepared statement to reporters in his office at the municipal police commissariat. “No one forces them to do it; there is nothing tricky going on and no cheating going on.”...

     

  • Shanghai DailyThe Shanghai Daily | August 11, 2014

    [read the article]


    HUMAN kidneys were labeled as seafood when sent from Nanchang, capital of east China’s Jiangxi Province, to Guangzhou, The Beijing News reported as it revealed details of a trade that led to 12 people being sent to prison last month.

    The kidneys were stored in a refrigerated container before being flown south to the Guangdong Province capital. One of the gang, Mo Yongqing, said airport security were told it was frozen seafood, something he said that worked every time.

    Mo, 32, was among those sentenced to between two years and nine and a half years in prison last month at Qingshanhu District People’s Court in Nanchang...

     

  • The Phnom Penh PostThe Phnom Penh Post | August 11, 2014
    [read the article]


    Police on Saturday busted an alleged organ-trafficking ring operating out of a military hospital in Phnom Penh, a ring they say included medical professionals working there and two generals from the Ministry of Defence.

    It is the second group of arrests purportedly connected to the illegal organ trade in as many months.

    According to a statement released by the Municipal Anti-Human Trafficking and Juvenile Protection Office, the group stands accused of “human trafficking with intent and being the accomplices of human trafficking with intent”...

  • Times of India Bengal The Times of India | August 7, 2014

    [read the article]


    KOLKATA: The CID has unearthed a racket in which poor people from four Bengal districts "donated" their kidneys to patients in Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan.

    This comes close on the heels of the detective department unearthing another such racket where poor people from Punjab and Chhattisgarh were brought to the city for "donating" their kidneys in lieu of cash.

    Lalbazar detectives had found how the "poorest of the poor" from Punjab and Chhattisgarh were promised Rs 10,000-70,000 for a kidney and brought to Kolkata as donors using loopholes in organ transplantation laws...

  • Tasnim news agency

    Tasnim News Agency | August 5, 2014
    [read the article]


    TEHRAN (Tasnim) – Iran’s intelligence forces have identified and disbanded a major ring involved in human organ trafficking activities.

    In a statement released on Tuesday, the ministry said seven members of the band have been arrested with the cooperation of the Judiciary body.

    It said the arrested members of the band have confessed to forging identification documents to gain their illicit objectives...

  • Chicago tribuneChicago Tribune | July 29, 2014
    [read the article]


    An EU-led inquiry found "compelling indications" that Kosovo Albanian guerrillas extracted body organs from Serb captives during the 1998-99 war and sold them, but the practice was not widespread and there was not enough evidence for a trial, the lead investigator said on Tuesday.

    After a three-year investigation, the EU-led task force said there was, however enough evidence to prosecute former leaders of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) for war crimes against the ethnic Serb and Roma populations of Kosovo during the conflict...

  •  Council of Europe logo
    Council of Europe | July 9, 2014

    [read the article]


    Strasbourg – The Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe has adopted an international convention to make trafficking in human organs for transplant a criminal offence, to protect victims and to facilitate cooperation at national and international levels in order to prosecute more effectively those responsible for trafficking.

    The Convention calls on governments to establish as a criminal offence the illegal removal of human organs from living or deceased donors:

    - where the removal is performed without the free, informed and specific consent of the living or deceased donor, or, in the case of the deceased donor, without the removal being authorised under its domestic law;
    - where, in exchange for the removal of organs, the living donor, or a third party, receives a financial gain or comparable advantage;
    - where in exchange for the removal of organs from a deceased donor, a third party receives a financial gain or comparable advantage.

    The Convention also provides protection measures and compensation for victims as well as prevention measures to ensure transparency and equitable access to transplantation services...

  • cambodia dailyThe Cambodia Daily | July 3, 2014
    [read the article]


    A woman accused of persuading vulnerable people to sell their kidneys to patients in Thai hospitals was arrested in Phnom Penh on Tuesday night. Among her five alleged victims are two of her brothers and a cousin.

    Yem Azisah, a 29-year-old woman who also goes by the name Sinuon, was arrested near her Chroy Changva district home by anti-human trafficking police acting on a complaint from one of her victims, whose motorbike had been held ransom by Ms. Sinuon as she sought her cut of the $13,000 price she had brokered for the man’s kidney...

  • LA TimesLOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2014
    [read the article]


    Tens of thousands of Americans are waiting for a kidney transplant. The gap between the demand for donated kidneys and the supply creates a situation that free-market cheerleaders can't bear to leave alone: People have two kidneys, so why not end our shortage of organs for transplantation by adopting a "cash for kidneys" program in place of the current law against organ sales? Gary Becker, a Nobel laureate in economics, calculated that putting a $15,000 price tag on donated kidneys would generate enough sellers to meet current needs.

    But buying and selling organs is a dangerous and misguided game, no matter how exalted the theorists playing it or how seemingly straightforward their calculations...

How to address organ trafficking – Point of View of the DICG

Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 12.52.35 pm


D. E. Martin

The Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) was established in 2010 to promote the principles of the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism, and to encourage and assist in their implementation in policy and practice throughout the world. In this paper, I review the work undertaken by the DICG and discuss the important and multifaceted role that health professionals must play in efforts to combat organ trafficking. The evolution of transplant “tourism” and the shifting dynamics of the international organ trade present complex challenges, and health professionals are well placed to identify and develop new solutions to these persisting problems...

Read the original article in French in a special issue on organ trafficking at Le Courrier de la Transplantation (subscription required).

Or download the English language version here.

Organ procurement from executed prisoners in China


A. Sharif, M. Fiatarone Singh, T. Trey and J. Lavee

Organ procurement from executed prisoners in China is internationally condemned, yet this practice continues unabated in 2014. This is despite repeated announcements from Chinese authorities that constructive measures have been undertaken to conform to accepted ethical standards. While there is unanimous agreement on the unethical nature of using organs from executed prisoners, due to its limitations on voluntary and informed consent, there is insufficient coverage of forced organ procurement from prisoners of conscience without consent. Strategies to influence positive change in China over the last few decades have failed to bring this practice to an end...

Click here to read the full article - Requires subscription to AJT

A needed Convention against trafficking in human organs

The Lancet June 2014Marta López-Fraga, Beatriz Domínguez-Gil, Alexander M Capron, Kristof Van Assche, Dominique Martin, Emanuele Cozzi and Francis L Delmonico.

 

More than 114 000 organ transplants are done annually in over 100 countries.1  Estimating that 5—10% of kidney transplants result from commercial transactions,2,3 WHO has warned against the worldwide “trade for profit in human organs”,4 which tarnishes this life-saving therapy.5 Although legislation forbidding organ sales exists in most countries,6 progress has been impeded by weak enforcement and the absence of comprehensive binding international instruments to harmonise regulations and improve cross ...

Read the article free at The Lancet here.

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