• Los Angeles TimesLA Times | September 15, 2016

    [read the article]


    By N.

    Seven years after leaving his village in northern India to find work in the bursting metropolis of Mumbai, Sundar Singh Jatav was struggling in a menial job at a video game shop. The $2.50 daily wage was hardly enough with his family back home deep in debt.

    So in late 2015, when his boss introduced him to a man who promised to solve his financial problems, Jatav listened — and was shocked.

    “He suggested I sell my kidney,” said Jatav, now 23.

    What happened over the next several months would upend his life — and reveal a high-level kidney trafficking network inside one of the most reputed hospitals in India’s financial capital...

  • Dawn PakistanDawn | September 16, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Naziha Syed Ali

    For a hospital, this centre for kidney transplants appears to have a lot of secrets.

    “No photography allowed”, reads a prominently displayed notice by the entrance.

    In the waiting room, an employee curtly tells the people present to not take any photographs and to switch off their cell phones. To confirm compliance, he even walks around peering over people’s shoulders.

    At least two security cameras are attached to the ceiling.

    One of the doors leading from the room bears the sign “Society of transplant physician [sic] and surgeons (head office)”...

    Read this comprehensive investigation into organ trafficking in Pakistan here.

  • The Gulf TodayThe Gulf Today | September 4, 2016

    [read the article]


    ABU DHABI: President His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan issued Federal Decree by Law No. (5) for 2016 concerning regulation of human organs and tissues transplantation. The decree has been published in the recent issue of the Federal Official Gazette issued on Sunday.

    The decree’s provisions shall be applied on transplantation operations of organs and tissue performed within the country, including the free zones. While transfusion and transplantation of stem cells, blood cells and bone marrow are excepted.

    It aims to regulate and develop transplantation and preservation operations of human organs and tissues. It further seeks to ban trafficking in human organs and tissues, as well as protection of rights of persons who receive or give human organs and tissues. The decree also ensures regulation of the donation of human organs and tissues, in addition to preventing exploitation of the patient's or the donator’s needs...

     

  • Daily News EgyptDaily News Egypt | August 20, 2016

    [read the article]


    Police arrested on Saturday six people on charges of forming a gang specialised in trading human organs.

    A force from Cairo’s security directorate arrested a husband and wife as well as four other associates who ran the criminal ring in southern Cairo’s Basateen neighbourhood  persuading people to sell their organs for money through an unlicensed medical centre, according to a statement from the Ministry of Interior.

    The husband’s apartment was the operation headquarters of the ring where they gathered victims and provide medical care for them before and after surgeries.

    The suspects were arrested along with two donors.

     

  • Scroll IndiaScroll.in | August 3, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Back in 2004, in an editorial for the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics on a kidney transplant racket, I began by saying, "In our scandal-prone Indian public life, one scandal distinguishes itself by the amazing regularity with which it hits the headlines every few years. The only variation is its shift from one city to another as if in planned rotation. Thanks to the desperation, ingenuity and collusion of the players involved, the Indian kidney bazaar, as it was crudely described at some stage in its history, refuses to die down."

    I ended the piece by offering a rather polemical solution: "The battle against this practice must be fought at two levels. The first is in the realm of the law and monitoring agencies. The second is an ideological battle against what is essentially a violation of human rights and a form of social exploitation of the worst kind. Otherwise, we will suffer the same cycle of rackets being exposed periodically."

    That statement, though not meant to be a prediction, has unfortunately turned out to be true. The latest act in this sordid saga is the one currently playing out in a Mumbai hospital. While the Human Organ Transplant Act of 1994 partly succeeded in curbing the then blatant kidney bazaar that thrived in the 70s and 80s, periodic exposés since then show that it continues in a more discreet fashion...

  • Hindustan TimesHindustan Times | August 10, 2016

    [read the article]


     Five doctors, including the CEO and the medical director of Dr LH Hiranandani hospital in Mumbai, were arrested late on Tuesday night in connection with an alleged attempt for an illegal kidney transplant, believed to be part of a bigger racket.

    Mumbai police investigating the case from last month apprehended CEO Sujeet Chaterjee, medical director Anurag Naik, and doctors Mukesh Shete, Mukesh Shah and Prakash Shetty for medical negligence, taking the total arrests up to 13.

    “Based on the report of appropriate authority today at 8:30pm, the Powai Police arrested the five doctors under section 12 and 21 of the transplantation of human organs act 1994,” said Ashok Dudhe, deputy commissioner of police and spokesperson for Mumbai Police. The accused will be produced before the Andheri magistrate’s court on Wednesday.

    According to a Powai police official, the arrest was based on a three-member state health inquiry committee report that stated a nephrologist and two urologists were negligent on multiple counts.

    Explaining the roles of the doctors, the official said, “They did not verify the documents thoroughly due to which their negligence has occurred. They should not have gone ahead with the surgery till they had satisfactory information that the donor and receipent are related. However, they have had a casual attitude and have not performed their duties properly.”...

     

  • Los Angeles TimesLA Times | September 15, 2016

    [read the article]


    By N.

    Seven years after leaving his village in northern India to find work in the bursting metropolis of Mumbai, Sundar Singh Jatav was struggling in a menial job at a video game shop. The $2.50 daily wage was hardly enough with his family back home deep in debt.

    So in late 2015, when his boss introduced him to a man who promised to solve his financial problems, Jatav listened — and was shocked.

    “He suggested I sell my kidney,” said Jatav, now 23.

    What happened over the next several months would upend his life — and reveal a high-level kidney trafficking network inside one of the most reputed hospitals in India’s financial capital...

  • Dawn PakistanDawn | September 16, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Naziha Syed Ali

    For a hospital, this centre for kidney transplants appears to have a lot of secrets.

    “No photography allowed”, reads a prominently displayed notice by the entrance.

    In the waiting room, an employee curtly tells the people present to not take any photographs and to switch off their cell phones. To confirm compliance, he even walks around peering over people’s shoulders.

    At least two security cameras are attached to the ceiling.

    One of the doors leading from the room bears the sign “Society of transplant physician [sic] and surgeons (head office)”...

    Read this comprehensive investigation into organ trafficking in Pakistan here.

  • The Gulf TodayThe Gulf Today | September 4, 2016

    [read the article]


    ABU DHABI: President His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan issued Federal Decree by Law No. (5) for 2016 concerning regulation of human organs and tissues transplantation. The decree has been published in the recent issue of the Federal Official Gazette issued on Sunday.

    The decree’s provisions shall be applied on transplantation operations of organs and tissue performed within the country, including the free zones. While transfusion and transplantation of stem cells, blood cells and bone marrow are excepted.

    It aims to regulate and develop transplantation and preservation operations of human organs and tissues. It further seeks to ban trafficking in human organs and tissues, as well as protection of rights of persons who receive or give human organs and tissues. The decree also ensures regulation of the donation of human organs and tissues, in addition to preventing exploitation of the patient's or the donator’s needs...

     

  • Daily News EgyptDaily News Egypt | August 20, 2016

    [read the article]


    Police arrested on Saturday six people on charges of forming a gang specialised in trading human organs.

    A force from Cairo’s security directorate arrested a husband and wife as well as four other associates who ran the criminal ring in southern Cairo’s Basateen neighbourhood  persuading people to sell their organs for money through an unlicensed medical centre, according to a statement from the Ministry of Interior.

    The husband’s apartment was the operation headquarters of the ring where they gathered victims and provide medical care for them before and after surgeries.

    The suspects were arrested along with two donors.

     

  • Scroll IndiaScroll.in | August 3, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Back in 2004, in an editorial for the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics on a kidney transplant racket, I began by saying, "In our scandal-prone Indian public life, one scandal distinguishes itself by the amazing regularity with which it hits the headlines every few years. The only variation is its shift from one city to another as if in planned rotation. Thanks to the desperation, ingenuity and collusion of the players involved, the Indian kidney bazaar, as it was crudely described at some stage in its history, refuses to die down."

    I ended the piece by offering a rather polemical solution: "The battle against this practice must be fought at two levels. The first is in the realm of the law and monitoring agencies. The second is an ideological battle against what is essentially a violation of human rights and a form of social exploitation of the worst kind. Otherwise, we will suffer the same cycle of rackets being exposed periodically."

    That statement, though not meant to be a prediction, has unfortunately turned out to be true. The latest act in this sordid saga is the one currently playing out in a Mumbai hospital. While the Human Organ Transplant Act of 1994 partly succeeded in curbing the then blatant kidney bazaar that thrived in the 70s and 80s, periodic exposés since then show that it continues in a more discreet fashion...

  • Hindustan TimesHindustan Times | August 10, 2016

    [read the article]


     Five doctors, including the CEO and the medical director of Dr LH Hiranandani hospital in Mumbai, were arrested late on Tuesday night in connection with an alleged attempt for an illegal kidney transplant, believed to be part of a bigger racket.

    Mumbai police investigating the case from last month apprehended CEO Sujeet Chaterjee, medical director Anurag Naik, and doctors Mukesh Shete, Mukesh Shah and Prakash Shetty for medical negligence, taking the total arrests up to 13.

    “Based on the report of appropriate authority today at 8:30pm, the Powai Police arrested the five doctors under section 12 and 21 of the transplantation of human organs act 1994,” said Ashok Dudhe, deputy commissioner of police and spokesperson for Mumbai Police. The accused will be produced before the Andheri magistrate’s court on Wednesday.

    According to a Powai police official, the arrest was based on a three-member state health inquiry committee report that stated a nephrologist and two urologists were negligent on multiple counts.

    Explaining the roles of the doctors, the official said, “They did not verify the documents thoroughly due to which their negligence has occurred. They should not have gone ahead with the surgery till they had satisfactory information that the donor and receipent are related. However, they have had a casual attitude and have not performed their duties properly.”...

     

  • News AustraliaNews Corp Australia Network | August 7, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Sue Dunlevy

    A three-year News Corp investigation has uncovered almost a hundred Australians who have illegally purchased an organ overseas, fearing they would otherwise die waiting here for a legal transplant.

    The unregulated trade is seeing prisoners shot on demand to supply human organs and poor people forced by debt collectors to sell their kidneys for as little as $1000.

    Doctors involved in the trade are charging up to $250,000 per transplant with anaesthetists, nurses, bureaucrats and brokers who source the organ all getting a cut.

    But patients often develop major complications and require expensive follow-up treatment when they return to Australia...

  • Jakarta PostThe Jakarta Post | August 1, 2016
    [read the article]


    President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo said on Saturday he had instructed the National Police to send a special team to investigate rampant human trafficking leading to organ trading in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT). 
    The President gave the instruction to National Police chief Gen. Tito Karnavian after receiving reports of 27 people who had been trafficked to Malaysia and had had their organs taken from their bodies. One of the victims, Yufrida Selan, 14, was sent home dead with her internal organs cut out of her body and stitches along her spine, indicating that her body had been cut open for the procedure. 
    “I’ve asked the National Police chief to pay special attention to this human trafficking case as it involves the organ trade and there were 27 victims,” Jokowi said as quoted by tribunnews.com. 
    Fendy Mugni, a committee member of Pospera, a group of NTT Jokowi supporters during the 2014 presidential election, said that Yufrida’s parents planned to meet Jokowi but the meeting did not happen due to the President’s tight schedule. 
    Jokowi also instructed the police to work with the military to resolve the case.

  • Phnom Penh Post

    The Phnom Penh Post | Jul 1, 2016

    [read the article]


    By B. Sengkong and E. Handley

    The National Assembly yesterday adopted a law banning commercial organ transplants in a bid to curb trafficking in the so-called “red market” trade, introducing heavy jail sentences for breaches.

    The law, which also covers human cells and tissues, stipulates that any donation of human parts must be undertaken on a humanitarian basis – commercial motives and advertising such services are forbidden and carry jail sentences of up to 20 years.

    The legislation’s passage comes two years after a seminal case of organ trafficking in the Kingdom in which Mot Hiriphin was convinced by a cousin that he could sell a kidney to pay off crippling family debt.

    Hiriphin travelled to a Thailand hospital for surgery and received $4,200 for his kidney.

    But lawmakers and law-enforcers yesterday acknowledged a “grey area” that would be difficult to regulate, in which poverty compels victims to give their organs to someone who – while not paying cash for the organ – might provide for the victim in other ways...

  • Harvard forumHuffington Post | May 21, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Casey Williams

    More than 121,000 people in the U.S. are waiting for an organ transplant. Some will sit in limbo for as many as five years before receiving an organ. Others won’t live long enough to reach the top of the waiting list: every day in the U.S., 22 people die while waiting for a live-saving transplant.

    There’s no easy solution to the twin problems of organ scarcity and staggering waiting times for transplants.

    Recruiting more living donors could help shrink wait times. But donating an organ is no easy task. Donors are covered by the recipient’s insurance for the actual procedure but are barred by law from receiving money to cover their travel costs or to pay for their recovery. The hefty financial burden often dissuades would-be donors from contributing their organs.

    Deciding who gets an organ when is tricky business as well. When an organ becomes available, potential recipients who live nearby and whose blood type matches the organ usually get first priority. Hospitals also allocate organs based on how urgently patients need them. But there's still much debate over how best to match and distribute organs.

    In a panel discussion hosted by Harvard’s Chan School of Public Health on Friday, experts will discuss these and other issues...

    Click here to watch this fascinating panel discussion featuring Professor Francis Delmonico, the Senior Advisor to the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group.

Guatemala - a pediatric transplant program

Development of pediatric transplantation in Guatemala

Excavating the Organ Trade: An Empirical Study of Organ Trading Networks in Cairo, Egypt

S. Columb


Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 8.39.09 PM

2016; Epub August 27

Legislative action in response to the organ trade has centred on the prohibition of organ sales and the enforcement of criminal sanctions targeting ‘trafficking’ offences. This paper argues that the existing law enforcement response is not only inadequate but harmful. The analysis is based on empirical data gathered in Cairo, Egypt, among members of the Sudanese population who have either sold or arranged for the sale of kidneys. The data suggest that prohibition has pushed the organ trade further underground increasing the role of organ brokers and reducing the bargaining position of organ sellers, leaving them exposed to greater levels of exploitation.

Read the complete article freely here.

Better buy than die?

Scroll IndiaScroll.in | August 3, 2016

[read the article]


By Sanjay Nagral

Back in 2004, in an editorial for the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics on a kidney transplant racket, I began by saying, "In our scandal-prone Indian public life, one scandal distinguishes itself by the amazing regularity with which it hits the headlines every few years. The only variation is its shift from one city to another as if in planned rotation. Thanks to the desperation, ingenuity and collusion of the players involved, the Indian kidney bazaar, as it was crudely described at some stage in its history, refuses to die down."

I ended the piece by offering a rather polemical solution: "The battle against this practice must be fought at two levels. The first is in the realm of the law and monitoring agencies. The second is an ideological battle against what is essentially a violation of human rights and a form of social exploitation of the worst kind. Otherwise, we will suffer the same cycle of rackets being exposed periodically."

That statement, though not meant to be a prediction, has unfortunately turned out to be true. The latest act in this sordid saga is the one currently playing out in a Mumbai hospital. While the Human Organ Transplant Act of 1994 partly succeeded in curbing the then blatant kidney bazaar that thrived in the 70s and 80s, periodic exposés since then show that it continues in a more discreet fashion...

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