• Jakarta PostThe Jakarta Post | Feb 6, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Fedina S. Sundaryani and Hans Nicholas Jong

    Health Minister Nila Djuwita Anfasa Moeloek came to the defense of the Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital (RSCM), saying that doctors and administrators of the hospital were unlikely tangled up in the alleged kidney harvesting case.

    Speaking after a meeting with National Police detective division chief Comr. Gen. Anang Iskandar at the police headquarters in South Jakarta, Minister Nila said that RSCM was only engaged in legal kidney transplants and not in the business of selling the organ.

    “Kidney transplants are legal and conducted to help humanity. Currently, [the National Police’s detective division] are investigating the sale of kidneys, which is illegal [...] I don’t think [anyone from within RSCM] was involved,” Nila said.

    Nila said that RSCM had met the standard operating procedures (SOP) that donors must through before undergoing an organ removal operation. - See more at: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2016/02/06/minister-police-clash-over-organ-sales.html#sthash.4ibptHxI.dpuf

    Fedina S. Sundaryani and Hans Nicholas Jong,

    Health Minister Nila Djuwita Anfasa Moeloek came to the defense of the Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital (RSCM), saying that doctors and administrators of the hospital were unlikely tangled up in the alleged kidney harvesting case.

    Speaking after a meeting with National Police detective division chief Comr. Gen. Anang Iskandar at the police headquarters in South Jakarta, Minister Nila said that RSCM was only engaged in legal kidney transplants and not in the business of selling the organ.

    “Kidney transplants are legal and conducted to help humanity. Currently, [the National Police’s detective division] are investigating the sale of kidneys, which is illegal [...] I don’t think [anyone from within RSCM] was involved,” Nila said...

    Fedina S. Sundaryani and Hans Nicholas Jong,

     

  • Jerusalem PostThe Jerusalem Post | January 29, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Judy Siegel-Itzkovich 

    Last year saw a record in the proportion of families of lower-brain-dead individuals who agreed to donate organs for transplant – 60 percent, according to Israel Transplant and the Health Ministry.

    Of 129 families asked by hospital transplant coordinators for permission to take organs, 77 agreed to give one or more.

    There were 433 transplant operations from deceased and live donors (174 kidneys; a 28% increase) in 2015. In addition to a variety of internal organs – hearts, livers, lungs, pancreases and kidneys – dozens of bone, tendon and heart valves were transplanted.

    According to the latest figures, 668 corneas were donated by families, and 42 burns patients received donated skin from the deceased. As people registered as potential organ donors receive priority for receiving an organ, 32% of those who received organs from the deceased were moved ahead in the queue because they had donor cards from the ADI organization..

  • the hinduThe Hindu | January 20, 2015

    [read the article]


    By T. Karnakar Reddy

    The episode looked a straight lift from the movies. The antagonist (Arun Vijay) in Entha vaadu gaani , the dubbed Telugu version of the Tamil hit Yennai Arindhaal — with Ajith Kumar in the lead — is an Ahmedabad-based smooth operator, who arranges human organs for money. The real episode that bore alarming resemblance to the film unfolded in Nalgonda, following the arrest of the kingpin in the kidney racket, Suresh Prajapathi (36), and two of his cronies, who facilitated 60 kidney transplantations.

    Police arrested Prajapathi’s accomplice Dilip Umedamal Chouhan (31), who used to help conduct health tests on donors at various diagnostic centres in Ahmedabad. They also filed cases against six Sri Lankan doctors working with four different hospitals in Colombo on the charge of conducting paid kidney transplantation in violation of ethics. Superintendent of Police Vikram Jeet Duggal told reporters on Tuesday that they arrested a native of Suryaraopet in Kakinada, Jenu Nookaraju (30), who was part of housekeeping staff in a private hotel at Gachibowli, based on phone calls received by Prajapathi in Hyderabad. Investigators realised that Prajapathi and Chouhan were coming to Hyderabad to meet Nookaraju and arrested them... [read the complete article here]

    [See also another article in The Hindu 'Kidney racket: manager of diagnostic centre held' reporting the arrest of the manager of the diagnostic centre involved in this case.]

  • times online Sri LankaSunday Times in Sri Lanka | Jan 22, 2016

    [read the article]


    Minister of Health Rajitha Senarathne said that the report of the Indian kidney transplantation racket case still has not been received legally to the Ministry of Health and a circular was issued to all private hospitals in the country prohibiting all kidney transplantations for the foreigners until the investigations are finished.

     He said that the report pertaining to the Indian kidney transplant racket  has not still been received by the Ministry of Health.  But a circular has been issued to all private hospitals  temporarily banning from performing kidney transplant operations on foreign patients until the investigations are completed, the Minister said...

  • Ceylon TodayCeylon Today | Jan 10, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Sulochana Ramiah Mohan

    Indian agents are assiduously touting neighbouring Sri Lanka as an ideal location for 'medical marvels' at reasonable costs and a hassle free operation or so it seems. So much so that Sri Lanka's fast becoming a virtual hub for this medico Mafiosi to clandestinely operate.

    But the proverbial 'lid has been blown' on the mega racket involving kidney transplants that run into as much as US$ 52,000 per transplant. Unscrupulous Indian agents are in tow with three leading hospitals in Colombo, where they wheedle healthy kidneys from utterly destitute individuals in remote parts of India, beguiling them to part with one of theirs for a sum of money that would be too tempting to them, to refuse.

    They have a network of around 95 sub agents working for the kingpins based in Kolkotta and Chennai, these two cities being pivotal centres for negotiating the kidney transactions and working cordially with three hospitals in Colombo, Ceylon Today learns.

    Colombo hospitals have become a haven for Indians to undergo illegal procedural kidney transplant surgeries. Most of whom, who hail from Rajasthan, Haryana, Chhattisgarh, and Maharashtra and the donors are from poor States such as Bihar and Jharkhand as Ceylon Today learns...

  • the hindu

    The Hindu | Jan 7, 2015
    [read the article]


    By T. Karnakar Reddy

    In a startling revelation, an unemployed youth from Godavarigudem village of Nalgonda district, who addicted to liquor and habituated to lavish life, has sold out his kidney to a donor for Rs 5 lakh in December 2014. Later, he turned in to an agent to the kingpin of international kidney rocket, which lured him initially, and facilitated 15 other transplantations.

    The donor was identified as Kasaparaju Suresh (22), who currently pursuing a hotel management course in Hyderabad.

    During the Police investigation, they have found that Suresh has facilitated 15 transplantations during the past 14 months apart from him. The donors include from Nalgonda (4), Hyderabad (4), Bengalauru (4), Tamil Nadu (2), Mumbai (1) and New Delhi (1).

    Surprisingly all the kidney transplantation surgeries were performed in Colombo in Sri Lanka at three major hospitals Nawaloak Hospital, Western Hospital and Lankan Hospital though the donors and recipients were from India.

    Speaking to news reporters here on Wednesday, Superintendent of Police, Vikram Jeet Duggal said that Suresh had facilitated for 15 kidney donations for which he got some Rs 50,000 to Rs one lakh as commission for getting each donor while the donor was given Rs 5 lakh...

  • Washington PostThe Washington Post | December 29, 2015
    [read the article]


    By Francis Delmonico and Alexander Capron

    Organ transplants have extended and improved the lives of more than a million patients over the past 60 years. This is a testament to the dedication and creativity of medical professionals as well as to the generosity of both living and deceased organ donors.

    Nonetheless, the rising rate of kidney disease means that some patients won’t get the transplant they’re waiting for. That shortage of organs has led to proposals to lift the prohibition on payment that has been part of U.S. organ donation law since 1984. But buying organs would be wrong. And aside from being wrong, it would also harm existing, voluntary donation programs and be ineffective in increasing the supply of organs. There are better ways to increase the number of organs donated than paying for donations.

     

    In recent decades, thousands of organs have been bought from the destitute around the world, for transplantation into the social elite in their own countries or “transplant tourists” from other nations. This has tarnished the reputation of organ transplantation and led to poor medical outcomes. In all countries, it is the poor who sell organs as a way out of their financial straits — usually only temporarily...

     

  • Jakarta PostThe Jakarta Post | Feb 6, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Fedina S. Sundaryani and Hans Nicholas Jong

    Health Minister Nila Djuwita Anfasa Moeloek came to the defense of the Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital (RSCM), saying that doctors and administrators of the hospital were unlikely tangled up in the alleged kidney harvesting case.

    Speaking after a meeting with National Police detective division chief Comr. Gen. Anang Iskandar at the police headquarters in South Jakarta, Minister Nila said that RSCM was only engaged in legal kidney transplants and not in the business of selling the organ.

    “Kidney transplants are legal and conducted to help humanity. Currently, [the National Police’s detective division] are investigating the sale of kidneys, which is illegal [...] I don’t think [anyone from within RSCM] was involved,” Nila said.

    Nila said that RSCM had met the standard operating procedures (SOP) that donors must through before undergoing an organ removal operation. - See more at: http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2016/02/06/minister-police-clash-over-organ-sales.html#sthash.4ibptHxI.dpuf

    Fedina S. Sundaryani and Hans Nicholas Jong,

    Health Minister Nila Djuwita Anfasa Moeloek came to the defense of the Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital (RSCM), saying that doctors and administrators of the hospital were unlikely tangled up in the alleged kidney harvesting case.

    Speaking after a meeting with National Police detective division chief Comr. Gen. Anang Iskandar at the police headquarters in South Jakarta, Minister Nila said that RSCM was only engaged in legal kidney transplants and not in the business of selling the organ.

    “Kidney transplants are legal and conducted to help humanity. Currently, [the National Police’s detective division] are investigating the sale of kidneys, which is illegal [...] I don’t think [anyone from within RSCM] was involved,” Nila said...

    Fedina S. Sundaryani and Hans Nicholas Jong,

     

  • Jerusalem PostThe Jerusalem Post | January 29, 2016
    [read the article]


    By Judy Siegel-Itzkovich 

    Last year saw a record in the proportion of families of lower-brain-dead individuals who agreed to donate organs for transplant – 60 percent, according to Israel Transplant and the Health Ministry.

    Of 129 families asked by hospital transplant coordinators for permission to take organs, 77 agreed to give one or more.

    There were 433 transplant operations from deceased and live donors (174 kidneys; a 28% increase) in 2015. In addition to a variety of internal organs – hearts, livers, lungs, pancreases and kidneys – dozens of bone, tendon and heart valves were transplanted.

    According to the latest figures, 668 corneas were donated by families, and 42 burns patients received donated skin from the deceased. As people registered as potential organ donors receive priority for receiving an organ, 32% of those who received organs from the deceased were moved ahead in the queue because they had donor cards from the ADI organization..

  • the hinduThe Hindu | January 20, 2015

    [read the article]


    By T. Karnakar Reddy

    The episode looked a straight lift from the movies. The antagonist (Arun Vijay) in Entha vaadu gaani , the dubbed Telugu version of the Tamil hit Yennai Arindhaal — with Ajith Kumar in the lead — is an Ahmedabad-based smooth operator, who arranges human organs for money. The real episode that bore alarming resemblance to the film unfolded in Nalgonda, following the arrest of the kingpin in the kidney racket, Suresh Prajapathi (36), and two of his cronies, who facilitated 60 kidney transplantations.

    Police arrested Prajapathi’s accomplice Dilip Umedamal Chouhan (31), who used to help conduct health tests on donors at various diagnostic centres in Ahmedabad. They also filed cases against six Sri Lankan doctors working with four different hospitals in Colombo on the charge of conducting paid kidney transplantation in violation of ethics. Superintendent of Police Vikram Jeet Duggal told reporters on Tuesday that they arrested a native of Suryaraopet in Kakinada, Jenu Nookaraju (30), who was part of housekeeping staff in a private hotel at Gachibowli, based on phone calls received by Prajapathi in Hyderabad. Investigators realised that Prajapathi and Chouhan were coming to Hyderabad to meet Nookaraju and arrested them... [read the complete article here]

    [See also another article in The Hindu 'Kidney racket: manager of diagnostic centre held' reporting the arrest of the manager of the diagnostic centre involved in this case.]

  • times online Sri LankaSunday Times in Sri Lanka | Jan 22, 2016

    [read the article]


    Minister of Health Rajitha Senarathne said that the report of the Indian kidney transplantation racket case still has not been received legally to the Ministry of Health and a circular was issued to all private hospitals in the country prohibiting all kidney transplantations for the foreigners until the investigations are finished.

     He said that the report pertaining to the Indian kidney transplant racket  has not still been received by the Ministry of Health.  But a circular has been issued to all private hospitals  temporarily banning from performing kidney transplant operations on foreign patients until the investigations are completed, the Minister said...

  • Ceylon TodayCeylon Today | Jan 10, 2016

    [read the article]


    By Sulochana Ramiah Mohan

    Indian agents are assiduously touting neighbouring Sri Lanka as an ideal location for 'medical marvels' at reasonable costs and a hassle free operation or so it seems. So much so that Sri Lanka's fast becoming a virtual hub for this medico Mafiosi to clandestinely operate.

    But the proverbial 'lid has been blown' on the mega racket involving kidney transplants that run into as much as US$ 52,000 per transplant. Unscrupulous Indian agents are in tow with three leading hospitals in Colombo, where they wheedle healthy kidneys from utterly destitute individuals in remote parts of India, beguiling them to part with one of theirs for a sum of money that would be too tempting to them, to refuse.

    They have a network of around 95 sub agents working for the kingpins based in Kolkotta and Chennai, these two cities being pivotal centres for negotiating the kidney transactions and working cordially with three hospitals in Colombo, Ceylon Today learns.

    Colombo hospitals have become a haven for Indians to undergo illegal procedural kidney transplant surgeries. Most of whom, who hail from Rajasthan, Haryana, Chhattisgarh, and Maharashtra and the donors are from poor States such as Bihar and Jharkhand as Ceylon Today learns...

  • the hindu

    The Hindu | Jan 7, 2015
    [read the article]


    By T. Karnakar Reddy

    In a startling revelation, an unemployed youth from Godavarigudem village of Nalgonda district, who addicted to liquor and habituated to lavish life, has sold out his kidney to a donor for Rs 5 lakh in December 2014. Later, he turned in to an agent to the kingpin of international kidney rocket, which lured him initially, and facilitated 15 other transplantations.

    The donor was identified as Kasaparaju Suresh (22), who currently pursuing a hotel management course in Hyderabad.

    During the Police investigation, they have found that Suresh has facilitated 15 transplantations during the past 14 months apart from him. The donors include from Nalgonda (4), Hyderabad (4), Bengalauru (4), Tamil Nadu (2), Mumbai (1) and New Delhi (1).

    Surprisingly all the kidney transplantation surgeries were performed in Colombo in Sri Lanka at three major hospitals Nawaloak Hospital, Western Hospital and Lankan Hospital though the donors and recipients were from India.

    Speaking to news reporters here on Wednesday, Superintendent of Police, Vikram Jeet Duggal said that Suresh had facilitated for 15 kidney donations for which he got some Rs 50,000 to Rs one lakh as commission for getting each donor while the donor was given Rs 5 lakh...

  • Washington PostThe Washington Post | December 29, 2015
    [read the article]


    By Francis Delmonico and Alexander Capron

    Organ transplants have extended and improved the lives of more than a million patients over the past 60 years. This is a testament to the dedication and creativity of medical professionals as well as to the generosity of both living and deceased organ donors.

    Nonetheless, the rising rate of kidney disease means that some patients won’t get the transplant they’re waiting for. That shortage of organs has led to proposals to lift the prohibition on payment that has been part of U.S. organ donation law since 1984. But buying organs would be wrong. And aside from being wrong, it would also harm existing, voluntary donation programs and be ineffective in increasing the supply of organs. There are better ways to increase the number of organs donated than paying for donations.

     

    In recent decades, thousands of organs have been bought from the destitute around the world, for transplantation into the social elite in their own countries or “transplant tourists” from other nations. This has tarnished the reputation of organ transplantation and led to poor medical outcomes. In all countries, it is the poor who sell organs as a way out of their financial straits — usually only temporarily...

     

  • Times of IndiaThe Times of India | Dec 19, 2015
    [read the article]


    NAGPUR: The state government has amended laws for organ donation and included grandparents and grandchildren in the list of donors. At the same time it has banned extraction of organs of minors and mentally challenged persons.

    Announcing the changes in law, medical education minister Vinod Tawde said that now organs donated by Indian citizens can no longer be transplanted in bodies of foreigners. "Other than doctors now trained paramedical staff can also extract eyes from donors. The committee appointed to oversee such transplants under the Act have now been given judicial powers," he added.

    The minister further said, "The Human Organ Transplant Act was passed by the central government in 1994 and it was implemented in the state in toto. In order to address challenges arising in the field, the central government amended the act in 2011. The state government decided to incorporate these amendments and also make some changes on its own." ...

  • Pakistan tribune

    The Express Tribune | Dec 6, 2015
    [read the article]


    By Ferya Ilyas

    For nearly 18 years Sameer Kiran lived in fear of an impending renal failure. The Karachi-based physician was diagnosed with an incurable congenital renal disease at the age of 24, and an early detection allowed him to arrange for a life-saving transplant procedure in time. Today, he lives to tell the tale of his battle with the silent disease, not knowing whether his donor was as fortunate.

    My doctors said there was nothing I could do and that I just have to wait and watch until the kidneys fail. And they eventually did in 2011,” says Kiran. Unlike the great majority of renal failure cases in Pakistan, Kiran was put on dialysis well before the complete collapse of his kidneys. In the three years that followed, he endured the morbidities of dialysis while searching for a family donor, and came close to death twice. When things started to look bleak, he decided to expand his pool of donors in a desperate attempt to find a match...

  • Israeli organ smugglerYeni Şafak | Dec 4, 2015
    [read the article]


    Turkish Police detained an Israeli man on Friday wanted by Interpol on charges of organ smuggling and fraud.

    He was sent to court after being detained at Istanbul Atatürk Airport; it was determined that he was in Turkey illegally. Interpol among other law enforcement agencies had a red notice out for his arrest.

    Wolfman is said to be a major figure in a gang that removes kidneys and other organs from living donors, who often have nothing else of value, and resells them at high prices to others who need transplants. This illegal business is rife with exploitation and unsanitary practices.

    Police are now seeking other suspects in connection with an organ-trading ring connected to Wolfman.

  • Aljazeera

     Al Jazeera | Oct 8, 2015

    [read the article]


    By Nishtha Chugh 

    Chennai, India - Three years ago, Vikas was a school dropout helping his father till the family farm near the northern Indian city of Kanpur - a job he despised.

    But today, his fortunes have changed. The 26-year-old is earning much more money working as one of the hundreds of kidney brokers across the Indian subcontinent, fuelling an ever-expanding multimillion-dollar black market for the sought-after human organ.

    "If you have the money and want it fast, you come here. I will find you a donor and you can go home with a new kidney in a month," Vikas told Al Jazeera, speaking on the condition that his real name not be published.

    According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), South Asia is now the leading transplant tourism hub globally, with India among the top kidney exporters. Each year more than 2,000 Indians sell their kidneys, with many of them going to foreigners...

Our body parts shouldn’t be for sale

Washington PostThe Washington Post | December 29, 2015
[read the article]


By Francis Delmonico and Alexander Capron

Organ transplants have extended and improved the lives of more than a million patients over the past 60 years. This is a testament to the dedication and creativity of medical professionals as well as to the generosity of both living and deceased organ donors.

Nonetheless, the rising rate of kidney disease means that some patients won’t get the transplant they’re waiting for. That shortage of organs has led to proposals to lift the prohibition on payment that has been part of U.S. organ donation law since 1984. But buying organs would be wrong. And aside from being wrong, it would also harm existing, voluntary donation programs and be ineffective in increasing the supply of organs. There are better ways to increase the number of organs donated than paying for donations.

 

In recent decades, thousands of organs have been bought from the destitute around the world, for transplantation into the social elite in their own countries or “transplant tourists” from other nations. This has tarnished the reputation of organ transplantation and led to poor medical outcomes. In all countries, it is the poor who sell organs as a way out of their financial straits — usually only temporarily...

 

Human rights and world culture: The diffusion of legislation against the organ trade


Fikresus Fikrejesus Amahazion

Article first published online: 9 Dec 2015, DOI:10.1080/02732173.2015.1108887

Sociological Spectrum

Abstract

Due to the process of globalization, rapid medical and technological advances, and the persistence of the global scarcity in organs, the organ trade has grown to become an international issue of increasing concern. Over the past several decades, more than 100 countries have passed legislation banning the commercial trade in organs. What explains this rapid, global diffusion of commercial transplantation laws, and what are the key factors influencing legislation? This study explores these questions through an analysis based on sociology’s world culture, world polity theory. Utilizing survival analysis models, the study covers 127 countries from 1965-2012. Results offer support for the world culture/world polity theoretical framework, while economic development also impacts legislation. The global trend toward legislation is influenced by global, cultural, and economic factors.

 

Full text available here from Sociological Spectrum (subscription required).

Historical development and current status of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China

BMC

Allison KC, Caplan A, Shapiro ME,  Els C, Paul NW, and Li H. (2015). Historical development and current status of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China. BMC Medical Ethics, 16:85


Abstract

Background: In December 2014, China announced that only voluntarily donated organs from citizens would be used for transplantation after January 1, 2015. Many medical professionals worldwide believe that China has stopped using organs from death-row prisoners.

Discussion: In the present article, we briefly review the historical development of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China and comprehensively analyze the social-political background and the legal basis of the announcement. The announcement was not accompanied by any change in organ sourcing legislations or regulations. As a fact, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China. Even after January 2015, key Chinese transplant officials have repeatedly stated that death-row prisoners have the same right as regular citizens to “voluntarily donate” organs. This perpetuates an unethical organ procurement system in ongoing violation of international standards.

Conclusions: Organ sourcing from death-row prisoners has not stopped in China. The 2014 announcement refers to the intention to stop the use of organs illegally harvested without the consent of the prisoners. Prisoner organs procured with “consent” are now simply labelled as “voluntarily donations from citizens”. The semantic switch may whitewash sourcing from both death-row prisoners and prisoners of conscience. China can gain credibility only by enacting new legislation prohibiting use of prisoner organs and by making its organ sourcing system open to international inspections. Until international ethical standards are transparently met, sanctions should remain.

Read the complete paper courtesy of BMC Medical Ethics.

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