• Overseas Tx News | 2 Aug 2018
    [read the article]


    Aussies are taking a big risk in their desperation to survive, with higher than expected numbers going overseas for transplants.

    Desperate Australians may be going overseas for illegal organ transplants in greater numbers than first thought. Official statistics show just a handful of people each year go overseas for a kidney transplant but a new survey indicates the real numbers may be a lot higher. To get a more accurate picture, Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand (TSANZ) president-elect Toby Coates surveyed members of the transplant community to see how many had dealt with patients who had overseas transplants...

  • GAEBA Media Release
    [read the full statement]


    Global eyecare community to unveil new ethical agreement for use of eye tissue

    Barcelona Thursday 14th June 2018: Members of the global eyecare and eye bank community unveiled the world’s first global Agreement on the use of donated human tissue for ocular transplantation, research, and future technologies, named the Barcelona Principles: An Agreement on the use of human donated tissue for ocular transplantation, research and future technologies.

     

    Read the Barcelona Agreement [here]

  • What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange programs International Policy Headlines | 08 June 2018
    [read the article]


    What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) programs?

    Critics of GKE programs argue that it would offer financial and symbolic incentives that have the potential of promoting organ trafficking, that it wrongly assumes that low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) do not offer organ transplantation to those who need it, and would add barriers to the efforts that LMICs countries are already doing to improve their responses to end-stage renal failure and organ trafficking...

  • Donor organ rumors refuted in Geneva China Daily | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By China Daily

    China to share organ transplant expertise

    Huang Jiefu, chairman of the China National Organ Donation and Transplantation Committee and also a former vice-minister of health, was speaking at a side event, entitled "Towards Universal Access to Solid Organ Transplantation", during the 71st World Health Assembly, which is running from May 21-26...

  • Proposed Bill to prohibit Canadians participating in organ trafficking abroad  Epoch Times | 23 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Omid Ghoreishi

    Senate Committee Hears from Experts on Human Organ Trafficking

    Senators in the upper house’s human rights standing committee heard on May 23 about why Canada should have its own legislation to combat organ trafficking. Bill aims to make it a criminal offence for Canadians to procure an organ abroad that was taken by force...

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    In some parts of India donations are increasingly saving lives. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. But more than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • Overseas Tx News | 2 Aug 2018
    [read the article]


    Aussies are taking a big risk in their desperation to survive, with higher than expected numbers going overseas for transplants.

    Desperate Australians may be going overseas for illegal organ transplants in greater numbers than first thought. Official statistics show just a handful of people each year go overseas for a kidney transplant but a new survey indicates the real numbers may be a lot higher. To get a more accurate picture, Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand (TSANZ) president-elect Toby Coates surveyed members of the transplant community to see how many had dealt with patients who had overseas transplants...

  • GAEBA Media Release
    [read the full statement]


    Global eyecare community to unveil new ethical agreement for use of eye tissue

    Barcelona Thursday 14th June 2018: Members of the global eyecare and eye bank community unveiled the world’s first global Agreement on the use of donated human tissue for ocular transplantation, research, and future technologies, named the Barcelona Principles: An Agreement on the use of human donated tissue for ocular transplantation, research and future technologies.

     

    Read the Barcelona Agreement [here]

  • What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange programs International Policy Headlines | 08 June 2018
    [read the article]


    What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) programs?

    Critics of GKE programs argue that it would offer financial and symbolic incentives that have the potential of promoting organ trafficking, that it wrongly assumes that low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) do not offer organ transplantation to those who need it, and would add barriers to the efforts that LMICs countries are already doing to improve their responses to end-stage renal failure and organ trafficking...

  • Donor organ rumors refuted in Geneva China Daily | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By China Daily

    China to share organ transplant expertise

    Huang Jiefu, chairman of the China National Organ Donation and Transplantation Committee and also a former vice-minister of health, was speaking at a side event, entitled "Towards Universal Access to Solid Organ Transplantation", during the 71st World Health Assembly, which is running from May 21-26...

  • Proposed Bill to prohibit Canadians participating in organ trafficking abroad  Epoch Times | 23 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Omid Ghoreishi

    Senate Committee Hears from Experts on Human Organ Trafficking

    Senators in the upper house’s human rights standing committee heard on May 23 about why Canada should have its own legislation to combat organ trafficking. Bill aims to make it a criminal offence for Canadians to procure an organ abroad that was taken by force...

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    In some parts of India donations are increasingly saving lives. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. But more than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • South Koreans traveling for transplant Korea Biomedical Review | 05 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Marian Chu

    ‘South Korea indirectly fuels organ trafficking in China’

    South Koreans were one of the largest consumer groups of organ transplants in China, indirectly contributing to the unethical organ harvesting market there, speakers at a seminar said.

    The data on organ transplants were presented at the “Vital Link seminar,” hosted by the Korean Society for Transplantation, Vital Link, Korea Organ Donation Network, and the Korea Organ Donation Agency, at Seoul National University Hospital on Thursday...

  • Kosovo case Balkan Transitional Justice | 02 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Dean B. Pineles

    Kosovo’s Medicus Case: Bad Omen for Rule of Law

    Six years of efforts to deliver justice were wasted when the defendants convicted in the Medicus organ-trafficking case were inexplicably sent for retrial, says a judge who served on the original trial panel.

  • Fank Inter Press Service | 30 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Maged Srour

    Human Trafficking for Organs: Ending abuse of the Poorest

    Organ transplantation is one of the most incredible medical achievements of the past century. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, “human organs for transplants have two sources, deceased donors and living donors; ultimately, human organs can only be derived from a human body, and thus any action in the field of organ transplantation must be carried out in accordance with the highest ethical and professional standards”. The reality is that in several countries such as India, Pakistan, Egypt or Mexico, organ trafficking has been peaking in recent years...

2018 Edition Declaration of Istanbul

High res  

 

2018 Edition of the Declaration of Istanbul

To download a copy of the 2018 Edition of the DoI, click here for English and here for Spanish.

Transplant professionals welcome update to the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism at international workshop

MADRID, July 1, 2018 – The first new edition of the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism, a seminal document that has helped to guide ethical practice in organ donation and transplantation around the world, was presented today at an international workshop in Madrid, Spain.

The Declaration was originally published in 2008, following a summit convened by The Transplantation Society (TTS) and the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) in response to growing concerns about international trafficking in human organs. It established definitions of practices such as transplant tourism and organ trafficking, and principles to guide policy makers and health professionals working in organ donation and transplantation. Since 2008, more than 135 professional societies have formally endorsed the Declaration.

The Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) is an international group of transplant professionals and scholars that works closely in collaboration with its parent organizations, TTS and the ISN, to encourage and support implementation of the Declaration’s principles around the world. In 2017 the DICG formed an international working group to draft a new edition of the Declaration, updating the definitions and principles in the light of clinical, legal, and social developments in the field throughout the last decade.

In February this year, the DICG launched a public consultation inviting feedback on the draft updated to the Declaration. All DICG members, members of organizations that have endorsed the Declaration, and other interested stakeholders were invited to participate.

More than 250 people from around the world participated in the working group and public consultation; approximately 65 submissions officially represented national or regional organizations. The response from the public consultation was overwhelmingly positive: participants welcomed the renewed commitment to combatting organ trafficking and transplant tourism, the updated and expanded definitions of key terms, and a clearer set of principles to guide policy and practice.

The new edition of the Declaration incorporating feedback from the public consultation was presented today in Madrid, at a DICG workshop celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Declaration, as part of the 27th International Congress of TTS. The new edition will be published on the Declaration of Istanbul website, with translations into several languages coming soon. In the coming weeks, a comprehensive Commentary Paper on the 2018 Edition will also be published. The Commentary Paper will explain the principles in more detail and provide suggestions for their practical application in response to questions and suggestions from participants in the public consultation.

To download a copy of the 2018 Edition click here for English and here for Spanish.

For media enquiries, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


 

Protecting Donors and Safeguarding Altruism in the United States. The Living Donor Protection Act


Alexander C. Wiseman

Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 13: 790–792, 2018. doi: https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.13681217

Clin J Am Soc Nephrol

 

 

 

The present state of transplantation in theUnited States can be most easily summarized as “good news/bad news.” On the positive side, improvements in shortterm outcomes have translated into measurable improvement in long-term survival (1), new allocation schema have increased opportunities for disadvantaged populations (2), and the absolute number of transplants performed annually continues to increase (3), in part due to strategies that facilitate living donation. The bad news, of course, is that these improvements are dwarfed by the growth of those waiting in need of a transplant (4). Although efforts to increase deceased organ donation are important, it would take fundamental changes in deceased donor management or clinical practice to more substantially affect the “need gap” via deceased donation. Efforts to facilitate living donation, specifically by reducing any barriers to living donation, are much more likely to affect transplant rates, thereby increasing the opportunity for patients with ESKD to receive the most optimal and cost-effective therapy. To this end, the American Society of Transplantation helped draft and drive introduction of the Living Donor Protection Act (LDPA).

The report can be downloaded here.

The key role of health professionals in preventing and combating transplant-related crimes


Beatriz Domínguez-Gil,Marta López-Fraga, Elmi Muller and John S. Gill

Kidney International (2017) 92, 1299–1302; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2017.08.034

Kidney International Logo

The distinctive feature of transplant-related crimes, compared with other criminal activities, is the necessary involvement of health professionals. This provides an opportunity for practitioners to help prevent and combat these crimes. Health professionals are key in evaluating prospective living donors and recipient pairs. They also care for desperate patients who are vulnerable and at risk for transplant tourism. Moreover, because patients who receive a transplant abroad require long-term specialized care, practitioners must deal with the many challenges of providing care to these patients upon their return home. This article provides guidance to health professionals and policymakers involved in the management of patients who may be considering transplant tourism or patients who have obtained an organ transplant through criminal means.

The report can be downloaded here.

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